Monthly Archives: January 2017

Shakeology Reviews: An Unbiased Nutrition Facts and Ingredients Analysis

Most Shakeology reviews have one thing in common: a vested interest in selling Beachbody products. 

That’s because they’re all written by Beachbody “Coaches.” [side note: I was a Coach for a short stint several years ago, so I’m very familiar with their marketing methods.]

While I do sell a plant protein powder of my own, my analysis/review of Shakeology’s products is unbiased because I use three objective criteria when evaluating their protein powders: 1.) Ingredients, 2.) Nutrition, and 3.) Cost.

Here’s the thing …

Shakeology actually has a lot of good stuff in it.

Unfortunately, there are some ingredients they use that concern me though, as you’re about to see.

Scroll below to see the summary and full versions of my Shakeology review …

Click here to get instant access to my FREE Google spreadsheet of plant protein powders comparable to Shakeology (20+ brands included).

Shakeology Reviews (Summary Version)

Similar to my other plant-based protein powder analyses, I am judging Beachbody’s Shakeology protein powders based on health and nutrition … NOT taste.

So here’s the deal …

In this section I’ll provide an analysis of Shakeology’s products as a whole and tell you the 4 things that concern me most about it. Below we’ll look at the complete nutrition facts and ingredients for each product separately.

Here we go …

Shakeology Nutrition Summary: All Products

Calories160-170
Grams of Protein16-17
Protein Source(s)Regular Shakeology: Whey protein isolate, pea protein, sacha inchi, flax, chia, quinoa

Shakeology Vegan Protein: Pea protein, oat protein, rice protein, chia, flax, quinoa

Grams of Sugar6-8
Free of “Natural” FlavorsNo
Free of Gums & ThickenersNo
OrganicNo
VeganYes
Cost Per Gram$.10

 

Here are 5 things I wish Shakeology would improve:

  1. Shakeology’s products are not organic.
  2. Shakeology shakes have an average of 6-8 grams of added sugar per shake.
  3. At $.10/gram, Shakeology is one of the more expensive protein powders on the market. (Note: I use cost per gram to account for different serving sizes).
  4. Most of Shakeology’s non-vegan shakes contain whey protein isolate. Whey protein may do more harm than good for many people with dairy sensitivities or allergies.
  5. Shakeology has “natural” flavors. The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) has an awesome web resource that evaluates the safety of the most common food additives. In its “Safety Ratings,” CSPI says natural flavors “may trigger an acute, allergic reaction, intolerance, or other problems.”
is shakeology bad for you
source: https://cspinet.org/eating-healthy/chemical-cuisine

Click here to get my FREE report on the dangers of natural flavors.

Next we’ll break down the nutrition facts and ingredients for each of Shakeology’s products/flavors separately.

Shakeology Ingredients / Nutritionals Review

Alrighty, let’s start with the good. I actually like a lot of the ingredients in Shakelogy:

  • Seeds: chia, flax, and quinoa
  • Greens: moringa, chlorella, kale, spinach, and spirulina
  • Probiotics/digestive enzymes
  • “Adaptogenic blend”: ashwagandha, maca, etc.

However, like I said above, there are 5 major issues I have with Shakeology’s products:

  1. They’re not organic. Any “superfood” that’s not organic may be sprayed with cancer-causing pesticides and/or high is in heavy metals. In fact, Shakeology found itself in hot water a couple years ago when Dr. Oz. issued a warning about the lead levels in their products. Beachbody, Shakeology’s parent company, has since reformulated their products to address these concerns.
  2. Sugar content. 6-8 grams of added sugar is too much for a 160-170-calorie protein shake for non-athletes. If your body isn’t using that sugar during exercise, it will get converted into fat.
  3. Price. At $.10/gram, Shakeology is one of the most expensive protein powders on the market. It retails at $130 for 30 servings.
  4. Whey protein. For people sensitive to dairy, whey is not a good protein choice. Read my article Whey Vs Plant Protein. Shakeology does make several vegan proteins, as you’ll see below … but they all have 6-8 grams of added sugar, depending on the flavor.
  5. “Natural” flavors. Natural flavors can contain hundreds of different substances–many of them chemicals–and still be called “natural.” Here’s what the EWG has to say about them:

Consumers may be surprised to learn that so-called “natural flavors” can actually contain synthetic chemicals such as the solvent propylene glycol or the preservative BHA.  Flavor extracts derived from genetically engineered crops may also be labeled “natural,” because the FDA has not fully defined what that term means.

Shakeology has 8 different products/flavors: chocolate, vanilla, cafe latte, strawberry, greenberry, chocolate (vegan), vanilla (vegan), cafee latte (vegan), and tropical strawberry (vegan).

shakeology review

Let’s have a look at the nutrition facts and ingredients for each, starting with the vegan ones, which I recommend over the whey protein based shakes.

I highlighted areas of concern in red below …

Beachbody Shakeology Nutrition Facts Labels

Vanilla Vegan Protein

shakeology vegan vanilla
There are some ingredients in Shakeology’s “superfood blend” I really like: the protein sources, mushroom powders, and herbs. However, beware of the red flag ingredients: sugar, “natural” flavors, xanthan gum.

Cafe Latte Vegan Protein

plant-based shakology
8 grams of sugar in a protein shake is way too much unless you’re a hardcore exerciser! It doesn’t matter is it’s “organic cane sugar” or high fructose corn syrup … your body processes these the same way.

Chocolate Vegan Chocolate Protein Powder

shakeology chocolate vegan protein ingredients
Again, some great superfood ingredients here; however, you should be wary of the added sugar and gums.

Vegan Tropical Strawberry Protein Powder

shakology tropical strawberry protein nutrition
Lots of different “natural” flavors going on here.

Chocolate Protein Powder

shakeology chocolate nutrition facts

Vanilla Protein Powder

shakeology vanilla nutrition

Greenberry Protein Powder

shakeology reviews unbiased

Strawberry Protein Powder

beachbody shakeology nutrition label

Cafe Latte Protein Powder

shakeology ingredients

Bottom Line: Is Shakeology Good for You?

Even though I have strong opinions about protein powders, I tried to remain as unbiased as possible in my Shakeology reviews.

From a nutrition standpoint, there are some really nice ingredients in Shakeology: quality protein sources in their plant-based ones along with with a nice mix of adaptogenic herbs, mushroom powders, and other superfoods.

However, the problems I have with Beachbody’s Shakeology shakes is they a) are not organic; b) have 6-8 grams of added sugar per serving, c) contain flavors, and d) are not cheap.

There are definitely worse protein powders you can buy, and the Chocolate Vegan flavor is the “cleanest” of the bunch when it comes to ingredients, based on my analysis.

But for the money, I recommend sticking with an organic, plant-based protein with 100% real food ingredients instead.

Click here to get instant access to my FREE Google spreadsheet comparing 20+ plant protein powders similar to Shakeology by ingredients, nutrition, cost, and more.

Aria Protein Powder Review

Fair warning: I don’t hold back any punches in my Aria Protein Powder review. I call ’em as I see ’em, and out of all the other protein reviews I’ve done (Vega, Orgain, Arbonne, and PlantFusion), Aria has some of the most questionable ingredients.

For those who don’t know, Aria is a top-selling protein powder marketed to women. It’s sold at Walmart and at their online store, Jet. Aria is owned by Designer Protein (which I used as a teenager back in the 90s!).

Before we get to my Aria protein review, it’s important to note that all my protein powder reviews are based on the nutrition, ingredients, and overall value for the money of each product. I don’t review products based on taste, because I don’t care to taste most of the products I review because of what’s in them. If you want a great tasting protein powder with a bunch of crappy ingredients in it, then this is not the review for you.

However, if you are (or aspire to be) a clean eater, then I’ll show you some facts about what’s in Aria’s proteins that may make you think twice about buying it (to that end, check out Pure Food if you’re looking for a clean protein powder alternative).

Here are the long and short versions of my Aria Protein Powder review:

Click here to get instant access to my FREE Google spreadsheet comparing 20+ plant protein powders by ingredients, nutrition, cost, and more.

Aria Protein Powder Review (Short Version)

There are three main things I look at when reviewing protein powders:

  1. Ingredients: are there organic, real food ingredients that you can pronounce? Any inflammation-causing soy, dairy, or gluten? How about fillers, flavors, or gums?
  2. Nutrition Facts: What do the key nutritionals looks like (carbs, fat, protein, fiber, sugar)?
  3. Cost: What’s the cost per gram and overall value of the product given the other two pieces of information above?

Aria fails miserably in each of these areas.

Here’s a quick breakdown … if you scroll down further after the chart, I’ll explain which of these concern me most.

aira chocolate protein powderaria vanilla protein powderaria vegan chocolate protein aria vegan vanilla protein
Aria Women’s Wellness Protein Powder – ChocolateAria Women’s Wellness Protein Powder – VanillaAria Women’s Wellness Vegan Protein Powder – ChocolateAria Women’s Wellness Vegan Protein Powder – Vanilla
Calories90909595
Grams of Protein15151515
Protein Source(s)Soy protein isolate, whey proteinSoy protein isolate, whey protein concentratePea protein concentrate, organic rice proteinPea protein concentrate, organic rice protein
Grams of Sugar1111
Free of “Natural” FlavorsNoNoNoNo
Free of Gums & ThickenersNoNoNoNo
100% OrganicNoNoNoNo
VeganNoNoYesYes
Cost Per Gram$.04 $.04$.04$.04
Nutrition/Ingredients (click each image to enlarge)aria chocolate protein nutritionaria womens wellness nutritionaria vegan chocolate nutrition factsaria vegan vanilla nutrition

 

Aria Protein Powder Review (Long Version)

When I browsed through various Aria Protein Powder reviews online, they all had one thing in common: a vested interest in selling Aria! In other words, bloggers create “review posts” in which they get incentivized for every time someone clicks on a link and buys Aria. On Amazon, my most trusted source for reviews, Aria has a 3.9 rating (out of 5 stars).

On Aria’s website, it’s abundantly clear their products are marketed toward women.

aria protein powder review
Look at those fit women doing yoga … if that’s what artificial chemicals and fillers can do to my body, sign me up!

Behind the pretty packaging and stock imagery of “aspirational” women doing yoga (that’s a term marketers use … it means they think you should aspire to be like the women in this happy photo), I have some major issues with the ingredients in Aria’s protein powders.

Here we go …

1. None of Aria’s Protein Powders Are Organic

This means their ingredients are likely contaminated with pesticides and herbicides. Yuck.

2. Aria Uses “Natural” Flavors

Natural flavors are NOT natural. They can contain hundreds of chemical ingredients that food companies may disguise under the name “natural” flavors. See this CNN article for a good explanation or check out my article about natural flavors if you want to learn more.

3. Aria’s Protein Powders Are Loaded with Highly Processed Fillers, Gums, and Additives

Aria uses lots of cheap, processed fillers in their protein powders. Here are a just a few:

  • Lecithin: a processed thickener that’s usually extracted from GMO soybeans using harsh, chemical-based methods.
  • Prebiotic Vegetable Fibers: While protein powder companies like Aria will tout their “beneficial prebiotic fiber”, the truth is these prebiotics are not always beneficial … especially for those with sensitive stomach. Prebiotics can actually lead to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or worsen existing digestive issues. If you have had any type of food sensitivities before, these prebiotics will likely ferment and create more gas that will cause your symptoms to worsen. Get your fiber from vegetables, fruits, whole grains and seeds instead. The good bacteria in your gut will thank you.
  • Gums: Aria uses guar gum and xanthan gum, which can be disruptive to your gut as well.

4. Aria Sweetens Its Protein Powders With Stevia Extract and Monk Fruit

Stevia extract is often derived using chemicals or alcohol. It’s certainly not the worst sweetener in the world but it doesn’t have the same health benefits as actual ground stevia leaves.

Monk fruit is a healthy sweetener in its natural state. But if the other aforementioned ingredients are any indication, my guess is Aria uses the cheap, processed version of monk fruit that’s extracted using GMOs (or contains the sugar alcohol erythritol).

Summary: Is Aria Protein Good for You?

I rate Aria Protein Whey/Soy Protein a 1/10 and Aria Vegan Protein Powder a 2/10.

Aria’s proteins are loaded with highly processed fillers. They’re not organic, which means they most likely have chemical pesticides. And at $.04/gram, you can pay a couple cents extra and get an organic protein powder with probiotiocs instead.

They’re sold at Walmart and marketed to women … but ladies, please make sure you give that ingredients and nutrition panel a second look and really understand what you’re getting.

Click here to get instant access to my FREE Google spreadsheet comparing 20+ plant-based protein powders by ingredients, nutrition, cost, and more.

Chocolate Chip Vegan Protein Cookies

Vegan protein cookies. When most people hear those three words, their first thought is “yuck.”

However, it is possible to create a cookie that’s free of dairy, gluten, and boatloads of sugar and still make it taste good.

These chocolate chip vegan protein cookies are proof.

Now, before we get to the recipe, let me say a few things:

  1. Any cookie recipe with protein powder and without butter, eggs, and/or milk added is going to taste a little drier than what you’re used to. That’s just part of the deal.
  2. The consistency for these cookies was kind of halfway between a cookie and cake or biscuit. So I guess you could call these “vegan protein biscuits” if you want. I think I made mine a little too thick. If you want a more cookie-like consistency, make them a bit flatter (mine were about 3/4″ thick).
  3. I used a combination of oats and gluten free flours (coconut and almond) because I have a lot of customers who can’t tolerate gluten (I, fortunately, don’t have a problem with it). You can try a whole wheat pastry flour or other whole grain flour if you’d like too.
  4. To lower the sugar content, I used dried dates (Costco sells a nice big bag for cheap) and organic dark chocolate with 85% cacao. I always recommend using 70% cacao or higher. The higher you go, the more health benefits you get.  There are several good dairy-free dark chocolate brands. I list my favorite one below. These cookies have more fiber (6 grams) and protein (6 grams) than sugar (5 grams), which is pretty impressive. You can cut down the sugar even more by using less (or no) dates and adding a little stevia.

Dark Chocolate Chip Vegan Protein Cookies Recipe 

What’s In ‘Em:

  • chocolate chip protein cookies ingredients1 scoop Pure Food Raw Cacao protein powder
  • 1 cup almond flour
  • 1/4 cup rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 1/4 cup organic dried dates (chopped into small pieces)
  • 1/4 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 cup pecans
  • 1/4 cup coconut flakes (unsweetened)
  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • 1/2 organic vegan dark chocolate chocolate bar (I used Alter Eco’s Blackout Chocolate with 85% cacao … it’s my fave)
  • Optional: pinch of organic stevia leaf powder (if you like things a little on the sweeter side … these cookies were NOT super sweet)


How to Make ‘Em:

  1. Put the dates in a food processor and pulse for about a minute. Or, just chop the dates up with a large knife and cutting board (that’s what I did).
  2. Finely chop the pecans.
  3. Chop up the dark cacao into chocolate chip-sized pieces.
  4. Stir together all the ingredients in a large mixing bowl until you don’t see any more dry powder and the chocolate has been distributed evenly.
  5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and spread your vegan protein cookies into 2 rows of 5 (or however many you want).
  6. Bake at 350 for 15-20 minutes (check after 15 and see how they look … I left mine in for 20 and think it was a tad bit too long).
  7. Let cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.

Nutrition Facts (per cookie… this recipes makes about 10):

  • 182 calories
  • 13 g fat
  • 14 g carbs (6.5 g fiber, 5 g sugar)
  • 6 g protein

Here’s the final product:

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Simple Protein Pancakes Mix & Recipe

The problem with most pancake mixes is their nutrition labels look like this: unhealthy pancake mix

High fructose corn syrup, soybean oil, and enriched flour … no thanks.

But most pancake recipes online aren’t much better. They, too, contain various forms of sugar, enriched flour, and junk ingredients. And science shows eating these types of foods definitively leads to major issues down the road.

I created a protein pancakes mix / recipe using Pure Food Vanilla Protein that’s healthy and tasty (my toddler even loves them).

I used 7 all-natural, nutrient-dense ingredients in this recipe.

This protein pancakes mix makes a simple and healthy breakfast and will appease all carb lovers like myself without the added sugar and refined grains. I used white whole wheat flour but you can substitute a combo of almond, oat, and/or coconut flours if you want a gluten-free version.

This recipe is vegetarian/vegan too … it has no butter or milk (I used almond milk instead and coconut milk works too). One serving has 10 grams of fiber and 14 grams of protein. Give it a whirl and let me know what you think!

Simple Protein Pancakes Mix / Recipe 

What’s In ‘Em:

  • 1 cup white whole wheat flourprotein pancakes mix ingredients
  • 1.5 cups almond or coconut milk
  • 1/2 scoop Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder
  • 2 T coconut oil
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 1 apple (sliced into thin pieces)
  • 1 T cinnamon


How to Make ‘Em:

  1. Mix all dry ingredients together in a bowl.*
  2. Heat a medium-sized frying pan to medium heat.
  3. Add 1 T coconut oil to the pan.
  4. Add the almond/coconut milk to the dry mix and stir until it’s clump-free.
  5. Pour about half the batter into the pan (I made 3 pancakes at a time).
  6. Cook for 3-4 minutes then flip and cook for another 3-4 minutes.
  7. Add the other T of coconut oil to the pan and cook the rest of the protein pancakes mix.
  8. Top with apple slices and cinnamon and enjoy!

*Pro Tip: jar up some of the pancake mix by combining only the dry ingredients and saving it for another day.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving (note: this recipe made about 3 pancakes each for my wife and I plus some for my toddler.)

  • 428 calories
  • 17 g fat
  • 54 g carbs (10 g fiber, 10 g sugar)
  • 14 g protein

Here’s the final product:

pancakes with protein powder

And close-up …

healthy high protein pancake

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Plant Fusion Protein Reviews: Nutrition and Ingredients Analysis

Plant Fusion sells a lot of protein powder. But based on the Plant Fusion reviews I read on Amazon, it’s clear plenty ‘o peeps are awfully confused about what constitutes a “healthy” protein powder.

Not to worry, because I’m here to clear up the confusion with my typical sardonic wit and wisdom.

Here are the long and short versions of my PlantFusion Protein Powder review:

Click here to get instant access to my FREE Google spreadsheet comparing 20+ plant protein powders by ingredients, nutrition, cost, and more.

Plant Fusion Protein Powder Review (Short Version)

Similar to my VegaArbonne, and other reviews, I am evaluating Plant Fusion’s protein powders based on health and nutrition … NOT taste.

There are four key criteria I use to determine the “healthiness” of a protein powder in my reviews:

  1. Organic, whole food ingredients.
  2. No allergens or inflammation-causing soy, dairy, or gluten.
  3. No fillers, flavors, or gums.
  4. No added sugar or artificial/highly processed sweeteners used.

On its website, PlantFusion says:

Let’s stick to the facts … the “supplement facts”

Clever marketing talk, but here’s a fact they’re not telling you:

Plant Fusion uses the same processed junk as every other popular plant protein powder!

Here’s a quick breakdown of their ingredients and nutrition facts:

PlantFusion Organic Protein PowderPlantFusion Complete Protein PowderPlant Fusion Phood ReviewPlantFusion Lean ProteinPlantFusion Ready to Drink
PlantFusion Organic Plant Based Protein PowderPlantFusion Complete Protein PowderPlantFusion PhoodPlantFusion LeanPlantFusion Ready-to-Drink
Calories120120200170150
Grams of Protein 20 21 1821 19
Protein Source(s) Organic pea protein, organic amaranth, organic quinoa, organic flax seed Pea protein isolate, artichoke protein, organic sprouted amaranth powder, organic sprouted quinoa powderPea protein isolate, artichoke protein, organic sprouted amaranth powder, organic sprouted quinoa powder, algalinPea protein isolate, artichoke protein, algae protein, fermented & sprouted organic millet, organic lentil, organic flax, organic chia Pea protein isolate, artichoke, organic sprouted amaranth, organic sprouted quinoa
Grams of Sugar 04 127
Free of “Natural” FlavorsNoNoNoNoNo
Free of Gums & ThickenersNoNoNoNoNo
100% OrganicYesNoNoNo No
VeganYes YesYesYesYes
Cost Per Gram $.07 $.04 $.03$.05$.01
Nutrition/Ingredients (click each image to enlarge)PlantFusion Organic Protein Powder Nutrition FactsPlantFusion Complete Protein Powder Nutrition FactsPhood nutrition ingredientsPlantFusion Lean Nutrition FactsPlant Fusion Ready to Drink Nutrition Label

The “facts” speak volumes about the quality of PlantFusion’s protein powders and shakes. So my reviews of all their products are summed up as-follows:

PlantFusion makes yet another very average line of plant-based protein powders and shakes. If you’re a clean eater who avoids processed ingredients like flavors, fillers, and sweeteners, you may want to choose something with organic, whole food ingredients instead. 

If you’re interested in taking a little deeper dive and learning more about PlantFusion’s ingredients and nutrition facts, keep reading.

Plant Fusion Protein Powder Review (Full Version)

Let’s switch gears for a brief moment and talk about what I like about Plant Fusion. As a company, I admire their commitment to plant-based nutrition and sustainable, eco-friendly products. I also really like most of the plant protein sources they use (pea protein, amaranth powder, chia powder, flax powder).

And their fermented, sprouted foods blend in the organic product is great:

sprouted food blend protein

On its website, you can read about Plant Fusion’s story. Here’s an excerpt: 

Plant Fusion Reviews
Ironic they mention “inferior ingredients” …

The second part I highlighted in red is what really concerns me … and what should concern you too if you follow a clean, plant-focused diet.

Allow me to elaborate:

1. “Natural” flavors are NOT natural.

Natural flavors aren’t real food … they’re science experiments. All the big protein powder companies, PlantFusion included, claim that they make “proprietary natural flavor blends”.

This means nothing.

Ask them exactly what ingredients and how many ingredients go into those “natural” flavors and you won’t get a straight answer (if they answer at all … I emailed them and didn’t get a response).

Natural flavors are often chemical-filled junk. Check out my article “What Are Natural Flavors?” to learn more.

2. Inulin

PlantFusion (along with many other protein powder manufacturers) contains inulin, which is a starchy carbohydrate that’s not absorbed by your upper GI tract (and is thus considered a type of fiber).

While protein powder companies will tout inulin’s benefits as a “beneficial prebiotic fiber”, what they don’t tell you is that these prebiotics are not always beneficial … particularly for those with GI sensitivities. Prebiotics can actually lead to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or worsen existing digestive ailments. If you have SIBO, these prebiotics will ferment and create more gas that will cause your symptoms to worsen.

On top of that, studies have shown that inulin encourages the growth of Klebsiella, a bacteria implicated in Ankylosing Spondylitis and leaky gut syndrome. Klebsiella can lead to serious infections in the urinary tract, pneumonia, and even death. So while inulin may indeed promote the growth of good bacteria, it feeds “bad” bacteria too.

If you suffer from GI sensitivities like I do, prebiotic fibers like inulin will only exacerbate your suffering.

3. Xanthan gum

Xanthan gum is another highly-processed, mostly-indigestible starch that’s used to thicken protein powders. It’s made by bacterial fermentation of a sugar-containing food. Usually that food is an allergenic and/or GMO-containing substance such as corn, soy, dairy, or wheat.

Here’s another little-known (and tragic) fact about xanthan gum. In 2013, several infants who consumed a baby formula with xanthan gum tragically passed away after developing necrotizing enterocolitis, a disease where the wall of the intestine is invaded by bacteria, causing infection and inflammation that can ultimately lead to death in infants.

Scientists reviewed the cases of xanthan gum-associated NEC, and found that the xanthan gum caused increased bacterial production of short chain fatty acids in the newborns’ intestines, and thus contributed to the development of NEC, which led to their deaths. (side note: the New York Times reported the story if you care to read about it)

I wouldn’t let my toddler touch any foods that contains this stuff. On top of that, it can cause unpleasant gut symptoms in adults. No thanks.

4. Sugar

One of PlantFusion’s products, the Ready to Drink Complete Plant Protein, has 6-7 grams of sugar per serving (depending on which flavor you choose). On its website, Plant Fusion says you shouldn’t worry about this because the type of sugar they use (fructose) is lower on the glycemic index:

Plant Fusion Sugar Content

Patrick Skerrett, former Executive Editor of the Harvard Health, disagrees:

Crystalline fructose … is not fructose gently extracted from fruits or vegetables; it is crystallized high grade HFCS.

Ouch.

Physician and author Dr. Joseph Mercola also warned about the potential dangers of crystalline fructose in a HuffPost article.

Crystalline fructose (a super-potent form of fructose the food and beverage industry is now using) may contain arsenic, lead, chloride and heavy metals.

Sugar is sugar. Please Plant Fusion, do us a favor and stop trying to spin it.

PlantFusion’s other protein powders use a combination of highly-processed fructose, stevia, and erythritol. You can read about the potential dangers of these pseudo-healthy sweeteners here.

Plant Fusion Reviews Summed Up

Plant Fusion makes very average vegan protein powders that contain too much junk, in my opinion. Personally, I’d rather spend a few extra dollars on a product with organic, real food ingredients.

Click here to get instant access to my FREE Google spreadsheet comparing 20+ plant-based protein powders (including PlantFusion) by ingredients, nutrition, cost, and more.