Category Archives: recipes

Plant Based Protein Pudding Recipe (Vegan, Keto, Low Sugar)

Creating a healthy and tasty chocolate plant-based pudding recipe that was vegan, keto-friendly, and high protein was quite the challenge, let me tell you!

But I can confidently declare this one a winner … and it has very solid nutrition facts profile, as you’ll see below.

The highest percentage of calories in this recipe come from fat (29 grams). But don’t fret–it’s good fats (monounsatured and polyunsaturated)–the types that have a beneficial effect on your heart health.

These “good fats” in the recipe come from three nuts that pair surprisingly well together: cashews, macadamia, and peanut butter.

And the protein content ain’t too shabby either–a solid 18 grams per serving thanks to the addition of Pure Food Cacao Protein Powder with Probiotics.

For all of you low carb / Paleo / Keto peeps, the carb count comes in at 17 with 4 grams of belly-filling fiber … for a grand total of 13 g net carbs and just 1 gram of sugar!

You could lower this even more by switching up your nut ratios and doing more macadamia/nut butter and less cashews.

Let’s take a look at the ingredients.

Chocolate Plant Based Protein Pudding Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups unsweetened oat milk
  • 1 cup cashews (soaked overnight)
  • 1/2 cup macadamia nuts (soaked overnight)
  • 1/8 cup peanut butter
  • 4 scoops of Pure Food Cacao Protein Powder with Probiotics (note: you can also try 3 scoops of Pure Food Cacao REAL MEAL Meal Replacement Powder).
  • Optional: If you like it sweeter, you can add a banana, 1-2 T sweetener like honey or maple syrup, or a tiny bit of monkfruit or stevia if you prefer lower sugar, which is what I used. Or try it with shaved dark chocolate and/or strawberries.

How to Make This Keto-friendly Chocolate Vegan Protein Pudding

  1. Start by combining the macadamia nuts and cashews into a bowl. Cover and soak overnight or give them a “quick soak” by adding near-boiling-hot water and soaking for 1 hour. Overnight will get you a smoother consistency though. Drain the water once done.
  2. Add the rest of your dry ingredients to a food processor or high powered blender (I used my Vitamix) and pulse. Slowly add the oat milk a little bit at a time until you get the consistency you’re looking for (taste frequently!). I blended mine for about 2-3 minutes on medium.
  3. Scoop the pudding into a bowl. Cover and chill overnight, ideally (or at least a couple hours if you can wait that long). Serve as-is or with some fruit/dark chocolate and you have yourself a very tasty and healthy dessert!
  4. This plant-powered protein pudding will keep in the fridge for 3-4 days. You can probably freeze it too, but I haven’t tried so proceed at your own risk! 😉

Nutrition Facts

Servings: 4

Per Serving:

Calories: 387

Fat: 29 grams

Carbs: 17 grams (4 grams of fiber, 1 gram of sugar)

Protein: 18 grams

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Grain Free Vegan Protein Balls

vegan grain free protein balls recipe

It’s not often you find a protein balls recipe that’s vegan, grain-free, Paleo / keto-friendly, has no added sugar, requires no baking, and still tastes delicious.

But that’s exactly what we’re bringing you with this new recipe. As you’ll see on our recipes page, we’ve made several variations of protein balls before but this one is quite unique.

It has a combo of several “superfood” nuts and seeds, including pistachios, walnuts, flax, chia, and coconut. Toss in some Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder with Probiotics and you get a nutritious, guilt-free snack or dessert that kiddos will enjoy too (my 6-year-old had a blast preparing and eating these, as you’ll see in the pics that follow).

Health-wise, here are just a few of the perks:

Health Benefits:

Ingredient

Health Benefits

WalnutsWalnuts can help you improve cognitive (brain) function and also reduce the risk of other diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, depression, and type 2 diabetes, which are risk factors for the development of dementia.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7071526/

PistachiosPistachios have a high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential. Among nuts, pistachios also have a lower fat and energy content and the highest levels of K, γ-tocopherol, vitamin K, phytosterols, xanthophyll carotenoids, certain minerals (Cu, Fe and Mg), vitamin B₆ and thiamin.

Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26148925/

FlaxFlaxseed is a rich source of the omega-3 fatty acid, alpha linolenic acid, the lignan secoisolariciresinol diglucoside and fiber. These compounds provide bioactivity of value to the health of animals and humans through their anti-inflammatory action, anti-oxidative capacity and lipid modulating properties.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6567199/

CoconutCoconut meat contains MCT oil, or medium-chain triglycerides. That’s the extract that people put in smoothies and coffee. MCT oil has unique benefits. It seems to lower two key hunger hormones, cueing a person to eat less. And MCTs convert more easily into energy compared with other sources of fat, like animal meat, so athletes consider it workout fuel.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4192077/

ChiaChia seeds contain healthy Omega-3 fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, dietary fiber, proteins, vitamins, and minerals. Aside from this, the seeds are an excellent source of polyphenols and antioxidants, such as caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid, myricetin, quercetin, and others.

Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31861466/

DatesStudies have shown that dates have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour properties.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3992385/

Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder Pure Food Plant-based Protein Powder contains a multi-source protein blend that’s just as effective as whey with the digestive side effects. And unlike other plant proteins, it’s 100% organic, high in fiber and contains no sugar.

Protein Balls Ingredients:

1 cup walnuts
1/2 cup pistachios (shells removed, of course)
1/3 cup flax meal
1/4 cup shredded coconut
1 T chia seeds
4 dates
1 T coconut oil (or other oil for greasing your pan)
1 tsp. vanilla powder or extract (optional)
Flaked salt (optional)

 

Directions:

  1. If your dates are hard or dry, place them in a bowl of hot water and cover to rehydrate. Let ’em sit for 5-10 minutes, then drain and pat dry.
  2. Add the walnuts and pistachios to a food processor and pulse for a minute or two until the nuts reach a fine “meal” consistency (there should be no visible large chunks remaining).
  3. Remove the seeds from the dates and add to the food processor. Pulse until they’re fully chopped (about a minute should do).
  4. Add the remaining ingredients, along with 1-2 T of water. Note: add the water 1 Tablespoon at a time. You will only need a little bit to make your mixture nice and sticky for rolling.
  5. Once all ingredients are thoroughly mixed and the mix feels slightly wet, grease your pan and start rolling into balls.
  6. Refrigerate or freeze for at least 1-2 hours before serving.

These will last for 7-10 days if you keep them refrigerated.

Nutrition:

Assuming you make 10 protein balls with this recipe, here are the nutrition facts for each ball:

Calories: 155

Fat: 12 grams

Carbs: 7 grams

Fiber: 3 grams

Protein: 6 grams

vegan grain free protein balls recipe

no bake protein balls

Try This Vanilla Apple Berry Smoothie Recipe Now

vanilla berry plant based smoothie recipe

I’ve been experimenting with some new smoothie recipes and this one was too good not to share!

It’s high in protein, loaded with antioxidants, and delicious!

Plus just 6 simple ingredients with no junk your body doesn’t need.

It’s the perfect way to satisfy your sweet tooth without the guilt.

Ingredients/Instructions:

  • 2-3 scoops of Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder
  • 1/2 banana
  • 1 apple (cored)
  • 1 cup of frozen blueberries
  • 1/2 cup of frozen cherries
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • Add ice and water to your taste and blend

This recipe will get you enough to feed a family of 4 (or some extra servings just for you).

vanilla plant based smoothie recipes

Try it out and let us know what you think!

Protein Brownies (Healthy, Low Sugar, Vegan, Dairy and Gluten Free)

If you’re looking for a healthy brownie treat you don’t have to feel guilty about, you’ve come to the right place.

Now, my criteria for “healthy” is admittedly a bit more stringent than most.

So this is definitely not a sugar bomb like your typical brownie. But check out these impressive nutrition #s:

  • 247 calories
  • 10 g protein
  • 6 g fiber
  • 4 g sugar

And not only it is low in sugar, it’s free of dairy, gluten, and soy … perfect for vegan, vegetarians, and anyone with food intolerances!

Here’s the recipe:

Homemade Healthy High Protein Brownie Recipe

What’s In It:

1 cup applesauce
1 cup oat flour
~1 cup chocolate protein powder (I used 8 scoops of Pure Food Cacao Protein)
1 tsp. vanilla extract (or real vanilla bean powder if you can afford it)
1/4 tsp. salt
2 T coconut oil (divided into two 1 T servings)
optional: 1/4 crushed nuts like walnuts or pecans (I used 1/4 cup walnuts)
optional: dark chocolate chips (I chopped up 1/4 of an Alter Eco Blackout Bar for this recipe, which has 90% cacao content)**

How to Make It:

  1. To make your own applesauce, blend the 2 peeled and cored apples with 1.5 cups of water.
  2. Add the oat flour, protein, vanilla, salt, 1 T coconut oil (and nuts and dark chocolate if you go that route). Mix thoroughly.
  3. Grease an 8″ x 8″ pan with the remaining T of coconut oil. Spread the mixture evenly onto pan.
  4. Cook at 325 degrees F for 20-25 min.
  5. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours then cut into 9 bars.

Nutrition Facts (per brownie)*:

  • 247 calories
  • 9 g fat
  • 31 g carbs (6 g fiber, 4 g sugar**)
  • 10 g protein

**If you like yours a little sweeter, add a little honey, coconut sugar, maple syrup, or stevia to the recipe.

Homemade Paleo Protein Bar Recipe (Vegan, Dairy Free, Gluten Free)

If you’re a clean eater, you know how hard it is to find a good healthy protein bar these days. Most contain some type of junk your body just doesn’t need: dairy, gluten, soy, sugar (in many cases, unfortunately, it’s all of the above).

My criteria for a “healthy” protein bar are quite simple. It should have:

1.) Only organic, real food ingredients, and

2.) No added sweeteners. Sugar should come from only real fruit sources like dried fruit … I don’t touch anything with over 10 grams.

If you want to make your own healthy protein bar, here’s one of my favorite recipes.

Homemade Healthy Protein Bar Recipe

What’s In It:

  • 1/4 cup organic quick cook rolled oats
  • 4 scoops raw cacao protein powder (make sure you choose a high quality vegan protein)
  • 1 cup organic nut butter (I used peanut but any nut butter will work)*
  • 1/4 cup organic pumpkin seeds
  • 1/4 cup organic dates, chopped into small pieces.
  • 1.5 cups organic coconut cream (or 1.5 cups coconut milk powder and 3/4 cup warm water)**
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • Dark chocolate shavings (optional)***

*I recommend organic nut butters with a maximum of two ingredients: nuts and salt. If yours has other oils or added sugar, look for another brand.

**Most coconut creams have some type of gum or filler added. I prefer to buy organic coconut milk powder on Amazon and mix it with water. Native Forest coconut cream.

**I recommend an organic dark chocolate bar with 70% cacao content or higher, 5 grams of sugar or less, and no soy (you’d be surprised how many of them have it … check the ingredients list).

How to Make It:*

  1. Whip the coconut cream until smooth.
  2. Stir in the almond flour and let sit for 20 minutes.
  3. Stir in almond/peanut butter, dates, salt, pumpkin seeds, and protein powder. Mix thoroughly by hand (or pulse in a food processor).
  4. Spread the mixture evenly into a pan or baking dish lined with parchment paper.
  5. Refrigerate overnight then cut into 8 bars.

*I used a mixer for steps 1-3 but you can do it by hand too.

Nutrition Facts (per bar)*:

  • 299 calories
  • 19 g fat
  • 18 g carbs (4 g fiber, 6 g sugar**)
  • 15 g protein

*I cut it into 8 bars. At ~300 calories a bar, you can cut it into 16 if you prefer something closer to 150 calories (it’s still filling too!)

**If you want to cut down the sugar content, cut back even more on the dates. To sweeten it up, add more dates or a dab of raw honey.

Low Sugar Dairy Free Protein Bar Recipe

If you’re sensitive to dairy and/or gluten, it’s darn near impossible to find a healthy, low sugar protein bar without a million additives and so-called “natural” ingredients you can’t pronounce.

But this dairy free protein bar meets all those criteria and more.

First, let’s talk about what’s not in it. These DIY protein bars are free of:

  • Dairy and animal milk ingredients
  • Gluten
  • Soy
  • Added sugar
  • Junk ingredients and additives like “flavors“, gums, and other fillers

Each bar is just over 250 calories, with 10 grams of protein, 5 grams of fiber, and just 3 grams of sugar.

Try this low sugar, high fiber treat that’s perfect for people of all ages (including kids … my toddler definitely approves)!

Healthy Dairy Free Protein Bars

Ingredients

  • 2 cups oat flour
  • 1/2 cup cashew or almond butter
  • 1/2 cup cashew or almond milk
  • 5 dried dates
  • 1/4 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/2 dark chocolate bar (we used Alter Eco Blackout Chocolate)
  • 2 T coconut oil
  • 6 scoops all-natural plant-based protein powder (like Pure Food Raw Cacao)

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients except chocolate bar and coconut oil in a food processor. Process until mixed thoroughly, about 2-3 minutes.
  2. Melt the chocolate and coconut oil together in a small sauce pan.
  3. Spread batter on a parchment lined baking sheet or pan.
  4. Top with chocolate/coconut and freeze for several hours before serving.

Nutrition (Per Bar)

*Note: This Recipe Makes ~10 Dairy Free Protein Bars

257 calories
15 g fat
10 g protein
22 g carbs (5 g fiber, 3 g sugar)

No Bake Chocolate Peanut Butter Protein Bites Recipe

no bake protein bites recipe

Chocolate + peanut butter. The two were definitely made for one another. And today I’m going to show you how to create something magical with those ingredients that’s actually good for you.

This healthy no bake protein bites recipe is:

  • Dairy free
  • Gluten free
  • High in fiber
  • High in protein
  • Low in sugar
  • Delicious!

It’s perfect for those of us who can’t tolerate (or choose not to eat) dairy and gluten. And best off: no cooking or baking skills required, which means it’s really simple and nutritious.

Let’s get to the recipe!

No Bake Protein Bites Recipe Ingredients

  1. 1 cup peanut butter (I used plain organic peanut butter with no salt added. Any nut butter will work though.)
  2. 3/4 cup oats
  3. 1 T hemp seeds
  4. 1 T chia seeds
  5. 1/2 dark chocolate bar (chopped into chocolate chip-sized pieces). I used Alter Eco Blackout Chocolate. In general, the higher the % of cacao is, the lower the sugar content will be.
  6. 4 scoops of Pure Food Raw Cacao Protein Powder
  7. 1 T honey (optional, depending on how sweet you like it)
  8. 1 cup water (or plant milk)
  9. 2 T shredded coconut (optional)

**Makes ~16 protein bites

How to Make the Protein Bites

  1. Put all ingredients in a food processor and turn it on for 30-60 seconds.
  2. Form the dough into balls (this recipe makes around 16 protein bites).
  3. Sprinkle with coconut, if desired.
  4. Refrigerate whatever protein bites you don’t eat right away. 😉

Nutrition Facts (Per Protein Bite)

134 calories

8 grams of fat

11 g carbs (3 g sugar, 3 g fiber)

6 g protein

chocolate protein balls

Get more healthy high protein recipes here.

How to Use Pure Food for Best Results (Healthy Smoothie and Food Recipes Included)

In this post, I’m going to show you how hundreds of others have used Pure Food to produce some pretty awesome results.

Whether you want to lose weight, put on some lean muscle, improve your energy levels, or most importantly, feel better, I’m confident the recipes and techniques I’m going to share below will help you.

There are lots of recipes in this post. I split them up between 1.) Smoothies and 2.) Food. I will continue to update it constantly, so bookmark it so you can come back if you need some inspiration!

Without further ado …

How to Use Pure Food Protein Powder in Smoothies

First off, use a blender for best results. The powder will mix okay on its own but it’ll taste smoother coming out of the blender.

Since Pure Food has only clean, healthy ingredients without the fillers, so-called natural flavors, and sweeteners other plant protein brands use, the taste is earthy and natural and your taste buds and gut may need time to acclimate to the probiotics. If you’re new to plant-based proteins and/or probiotics, start with one scoop (10 grams) and work your way up from there.

GIVE PURE FOOD TIME TO WORK
Pure Food will help you feel better and you will experience noticeable improvements in your health if you give it time to work. 

We recommend at least 14 days to allow the probiotics time to colonize in your gut. The probiotic strain we use, by the way, has been clinically shown to boost immunity, improve gut health, and help your body digest plant proteins better.

Like any good health or fitness product (and it should go without saying), you need to make a commitment to yourself by eating cleaner and exercising if you really want to see results fast.

Pure Food Smoothie / Juice / Liquid Recipes

Here are some of my favorite smoothie and juice recipes using both Pure Food Cacao and Vanilla Protein:

Simple Chocolate Banana Smoothie

Cacao Chia Berry Blast

  • 1 scoop Pure Food Cacao Protein Powder
  • 1/2 cup frozen organic berries
  • 1 T organic chia seeds (flax, hemp, or pumpkin work too)
  • Handful of ice
  • Water (or milk) to taste

Chocolate Fat Burning Smoothie

Chocolate Meal Replacement Smoothie

  • 2 scoops Pure Food Cacao Protein Powder
  • 1/2 banana
  • 2 T organic oat flour
  • 1 T organic coconut oil
  • 1 T extra virgin olive oil
  • Handful of ice
  • Water (or milk) to taste

Want 3 More Pure Food Meal Replacement Recipes? Grab These Free Recipe Cards

Vanilla Berry Blast

Tropical Superfood Smoothie

Strawberry Banana Green Smoothie

  • 1/2 scoop Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder
  • 1/2 banana
  • 1/2 cup frozen organic strawberries
  • 1 handful organic greens (spinach, kale, chard, etc.)
  • 3-4 ice cubes
  • Water (or milk) to taste

See more Pure Food Smoothie recipes on Instagram

Food

Some of these recipes were sent to us by customers and others were created by us. You’ll find tasty-yet-healthy overnight oats, protein balls, cookies, brownies … even bread for all you carb-lovers.

Some of these recipes require baking and some don’t. Cooking/high heat denatures some of the nutrients in any food, including Pure Food, so I cook with mine sparingly.

But these recipes are a nutritious way to satisfy your sweet tooth (disclaimer: they’re not going to taste the exact same as their “regular” sugar- and junk-filled counterpart). With that said, we think they’re pretty darn good.

Pure Food Solid Food Recipes

no bake protein barNo-bake Protein Balls

No-Bake Protein Bars

Protein Muffins

Protein Pudding (or Ice Cream)

Chocolate Chip Vegan Cookies

Protein Pancakes

Healthy “Brownies”

Protein Bread

If you have additional recipe ideas, questions, or comments about how you use Pure Food, please share them with me by  emailing me directly at Scott@purefoodcompany.com

Enjoy!

Scott Christ

Founder, Pure Food Co.

Best Clean Eats: Plant-based Clean Eating Food List for 2021

what is eating cleanWhen you claim to have created the world’s cleanest plant-based protein powder like we do, you better darn well know a thing or two about clean eats.

So with that said, I can tell you with conviction that I have spent countless hours reading labels, poring over nutrition research studies and articles, and dropping half my paychecks at Whole Foods in search of the healthiest “clean” products on the market that meet my dietary restrictions (I’m allergic to dairy and corn and avoid most products with gluten and soy too).

In this post, I will share my findings with you. You’ll discover:

1) What clean eating actually means.

2) How to spot and avoid brands posing as “clean.”

3) My 10 favorite clean eating packaged foods.

Let’s start with #1 …

Clean Eating Basics

What does it mean to “eat clean”?

clean eatsI’ll be the first to admit that the term clean eating is ambiguous … enough to elicit some scathing reactions.

Like this response from one of the top writers on Quora:

It’s a vague term for faddish eating, mostly with an orthorexic bent. It has no scientific basis and, like pretty much all food fads, is rooted in a fear of modernity.

And this one from a registered dietitian published in the British Medical Journal:

The command to eat cleanly implies that everyone else is filthy, being careless with their bodies and lives. It comes with promises of energy boosts, glowing skin, spirituality, purity, and possibly immortality. But this nonsense is all based on a loose interpretation of facts and a desire to make the pursuit of wellbeing an obsessive, full time occupation.

Ouch.

I disagree with both and I’ll tell you why in a minute.

First, here’s my definition of clean eating:

A whole food, plant-focused diet that’s low in sugar, refined carbohydrates, and other artificial ingredients.

The body of evidence that supports the health benefits of eating this way is enormous. So maybe eating “clean” is just another label … but it’s one that I believe can be of real, tangible benefit to people who don’t know how to eat healthy (or who do but aspire to eat better).

What’s the harm in that?

To me, there are bigger fish to fry anyway …

clean eats product marketing claimsThe real problem with clean eating

One of the underlying reasons for much of the aforementioned ambiguity and debate is Big Food coming in and slapping clean eating claims on all types of unhealthy packaged foods.

For example, some of my competitors in the protein powder industry sell sugar sweetened beverages to children that are marketed as clean and “all-natural”.

Not cool.

In addition to added sugar or artificial sugar, many so-called “clean” products on the market contain mystery ingredients and fillers like gums and “natural flavors,” which are now the fourth most common ingredient on food labels.

It should come as no surprise that those clever food product marketers have found ways to exploit the “all-natural” and “clean” claims, since the FDA doesn’t regulate use of these terms.

So how do you know what’s clean and what’s not?

Well, clearly “clean” is open to interpretation. But here’s what I look for:

  1. Organic ingredients I recognize as whole, real foods.
  2. No added sugar.
  3. No refined white flour.
  4. No dairy or corn-based ingredients.
  5. No mystery fillers like gums, “flavors”, and other additives.

If you stick with products that meet those criteria, it’s hard to go wrong.

When in doubt, the ingredients and nutrition facts label are the two objective sources of truth on any packaged food product.

If you don’t know what something is, don’t buy it until you research the safety of the ingredients. Check out credible sources that back their claims with peer-reviewed science (like the EWGCSPI and Pubmed).

10 Best Plant-based “Clean Label” Packaged Food Brands for 2021

I’m not saying you need to be a vegetarian or vegan to eat clean. But the focus on my clean eating approach is plants … because 99.9% of us can benefit from eating plant-based.

The clean eating brands I’m going to show you below contains food products with no or extremely minimal:

  • Added sugar
  • Artificial ingredients
  • Allergens like soy, dairy, gluten, and corn
  • Animal products
  • Highly processed ingredients posing as “natural” (e.g., flavors, gums, and other additives)

Malk: Their unsweetened almond and cashew milks are among the very few without gums, fillers, and additives. Here are the ingredients in the almond milk: organic almonds, Himalayan salt, filtered water. They also have a great almond milk/oat milk non-dairy creamer. Use their Store Finder to see if it’s available near you.

Made Good: Made Good Foods has a line of better-for-you granola products and delicious cookies that  are certified vegan, organic, and non-GMO with just 6 grams of sugar and 110 calories.

From the Ground Up: These guys sell some mighty tasty cauliflower crackers, pretzels, and potato chips. Their ingredients are plant-based, super simple, and contain no corn, wheat, dairy, or artificial junk.

Autumn’s Gold: Their grain-free, Paleo-certified granola and granola bars are very good tasting and contain much less sugar than your run-of-the-mill granola. Available on Amazon too.

Italian Volcano: Dream Foods International makes organic citrus juices and natural ethnic foods. The company began bottling juices near the Mt. Etna volcano in Sicily. I absolutely love their Italian Volcano Lemon Juice, which I add to my water (and it’s great for soups and sauces). They sell a 2-pack at Costco here in Michigan.

Nutiva: Great source for organic coconut oil and hemp seeds. Here’s the Store Locator. Most of their products can be found on Amazon as well. I love their coconut manna as a high fat dessert for all you keto people out there!

Bragg Organic: Bragg apple cider vinegar, “liquid aminos” (non-GMO, lower sodium soy sauce), coconut aminos (soy free), and nutritional yeast are staples in my clean eating recipes.

The Brinery: Based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, their fermented products are among the best I’ve ever had. From their website: “People often hear “sauerkraut” and think of vinegary limp vegetables in a can or bag, but at The Brinery, we transform vegetables through the process of lacto-fermentation.  Our name tells you everything you need to know about this ancient art of food preservation – we add a natural salt brine to farm fresh vegetables. That’s it.” Love that.

Wildbrine: My co-favorite fermented foods company. Wildbrine now sells sauerkraut, kimchi, salsa, hot sauce, and plant-based cheese. They are all fantastic. This brand is legit … and so are the health benefits associated with all of its fermented products. Eat more fermented foods, people!

Alter Eco: Alter Eco’s dark blackout chocolate is dairy-free, has 4 simple, organic ingredients, and contains 85% cacao for a healthy dose of antioxidants. It has just 4 grams of sugar and also 4 grams of fiber per serving (a Snickers bar has 20 grams of sugar, for comparison’s sake). They also sell other chocolates, coconut truffles, quinoa, and rice.

Final Thoughts About Clean Eats

Hopefully this provides some inspiration and ideas to help you find cleaner products. It hasn’t been easy in the past but now you’re starting to see a lot of brands jumping on the clean eating bandwagon … and I think that’s a good thing.

Minimally processed foods with ingredients you can pronounce are generally (but not always) healthier.

If you have questions or want to share your favorite clean eating foods and/or packaged products, leave a comment below.

And don’t forget to hit those share buttons on the left if you found this post helpful. 🙂

Pure Food Healthy High Protein Muffins Recipe

One of our awesome Pure Food customers Traci shared this Pure Food protein muffins recipe with me and it was too good not to share.

Traci hails from Naw’lens, Lousiana (I bet people from New Orleans get annoyed with that real quick). She says she whipped up these healthy muffins as a cleaner, healthier alternative to beignets.

I made a few modifications with the ingredients I had on hand that I noted below (I still included the original recipe though).

Best part is, this high protein muffin recipe is nutritious. It’s low in sugar, high in fiber, and is soy, dairy, and gluten free … pretty awesome!

Here’s the ingredients and instructions:

Pure Food High Protein Muffins Recipe Ingredients

healthy high protein muffins ingredients1 scoop of Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder (note: I added 2 scoops)

2 cups of old fashioned oatmeal

1/2 cup of egg whites

1 banana

2 Tablespoons of hemp seeds

2 Tablespoons of chia seeds

2 Tablespoons of unsweetened coconut flakes

1 Tablespoons of light agave (note: I used organic coconut sugar)

1 teaspoon of vanilla extract (note: I used whole vanilla bean powder)

A pinch of pink Himalayan salt (note: I used plain sea salt)

How to Make the Muffins

  1. vanilla protein healthy muffinsMash one banana in a large bowl. Add one scoop of Pure Food Protein powder Vanilla. Stir.
  2. Add Agave (or coconut sugar), Vanilla, Hemp seeds, Chia seeds, and Coconut. Stir.
  3. Add two cups of oatmeal. Stir.
  4. Add egg whites to form a solid dough. Stir.
  5. Sprinkle sea salt.
  6. Take muffin pan. Spray with coconut oil. Create little muffins by rolling dough in your palms. Drop in muffin pan. Bake 8-10 minutes at 380 degrees. (note: I added about 5 minutes of cooking time since my muffins were larger. If you do 8 smaller ones stick with 8-10 minutes and see if they’re done).** 

Keep refrigerated after baked.

If you want them heated, heat them in microwave for 3 minutes at 20% power.

**I made 4 large muffins and ate one as a post-workout snack. As you’ll see below, if you go that route you get a solid 345 calories, 10 grams of fiber, and 19 grams of protein!

Here’s the final product …

gluten free muffin recipes

Nutrition Facts

Calories: 345

Carbs: 46 grams

Fiber: 10 grams

Sugar: 6 grams

Protein: 19 grams

Fat: 11 grams

Check out my other high protein recipes for more inspiration. And if you have a Pure Food recipe you love, please share it with me by replying to this post or shooting me an email at Scott@purefoodcompany.com!