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50 Vanilla and Chocolate High Protein Smoothie Recipes

Making smoothies is the fastest, easiest way to get more protein.

Below you’ll find a list of 50 of our favorite healthy and tasty high-protein smoothie recipes (both chocolate and vanilla). You can substitute the protein powder below with your preferred source.

Pure Food currently offers plant-based protein and collagen … if you’re interested in high-quality whey isolate, contact us.

  1. Classic Strawberry Banana Smoothie
    • 1 cup strawberries (fresh or frozen)
    • 1 ripe banana
    • 1/2 cup yogurt (Greek plain)
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  2. Vanilla Berry Blast Smoothie (Strawberry, Blueberry, Raspberry)
    • 1/2 cup strawberries (fresh or frozen)
    • 1/4 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen)
    • 1/4 cup raspberries (fresh or frozen)
    • 1/2 cup vanilla yogurt (sugar free)
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  3. Chocolate Peanut Butter Banana Smoothie
  4. Blueberry Spinach Smoothie with Vanilla Yogurt
    • 1/2 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen)
    • Handful of spinach leaves
    • 1/2 cup vanilla yogurt (sugar free)
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  5. Chocolate Cherry Almond Smoothie
  6. Vanilla Mango Berry Smoothie
    • 1/2 cup mango chunks (fresh or frozen)
    • 1/4 cup strawberries (fresh or frozen)
    • 1/4 cup raspberries (fresh or frozen)
    • 1/2 cup vanilla yogurt
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  7. Chocolate Raspberry Vanilla Smoothie
  8. Peanut Butter Banana Berry Collagen Smoothie
    • 1 ripe banana
    • 2 tablespoons peanut butter
    • 1/2 cup mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • 20 grams of collagen protein powder
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  9. Mixed Berry Yogurt Smoothie
  10. Vanilla Berry Protein Smoothie
    • 1/2 cup mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 1/2 cup vanilla yogurt
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  11. Chocolate Coconut Almond Smoothie
  12. Peach Vanilla Smoothie
  13. Chocolate Avocado Banana Smoothie
  14. Berry Medley Smoothie with Honey Drizzle
    • 1/2 cup mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    • 1 tablespoon honey or maple syrup
    • 20 grams of chocolate protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  15. Vanilla Blueberry Spinach Smoothie
  16. Chocolate Strawberry Banana Smoothie
  17. Very Berry Vanilla Yogurt Smoothie
    • 1/2 cup mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    • 1/2 cup vanilla yogurt (sugar free)
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  18. Chocolate Almond Butter Banana Smoothie
  19. Tropical Vanilla Smoothie (Mango, Pineapple, Banana)
    • 1/2 cup mango chunks (fresh or frozen)
    • 1/4 cup pineapple chunks (fresh or frozen)
    • 1/2 ripe banana
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  20. Chocolate Peanut Butter Blueberry Smoothie
  21. Vanilla Mixed Berry Smoothie
  22. Chocolate Spinach Banana Smoothie
  23. Raspberry Vanilla Yogurt Smoothie
  24. Chocolate Coconut Banana Smoothie
  25. Vanilla Peach Raspberry Smoothie
  26. Blueberry Chocolate Vanilla Smoothie
  27. Vanilla Berry Oatmeal Smoothie
    • 1/2 cup mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    • 1/4 cup rolled oats
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  28. Chocolate Raspberry Greek Yogurt Smoothie
  29. Banana Berry Vanilla Smoothie
    • 1 ripe banana
    • 1/2 cup mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  30. Vanilla Green Smoothie (Spinach, Banana, Apple)
  31. Chocolate Cherry Vanilla Smoothie
  32. Mixed Berry Chocolate Protein Smoothie
  33. Vanilla Mango Banana Smoothie
  34. Chocolate Strawberry Spinach Smoothie
  35. Vanilla Berry Coconut Smoothie
    • 1/2 cup mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    • 1/4 cup shredded coconut
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  36. Chocolate Raspberry Chia Smoothie
  37. Vanilla Pineapple Coconut Smoothie
  38. Blueberry Chocolate Almond Milk Smoothie
  39. Vanilla Raspberry Coconut Smoothie
  40. Chocolate Mixed Berry Protein Smoothie
  41. Vanilla Peach Banana Smoothie
  42. Chocolate Raspberry Coconut Smoothie
  43. Vanilla Strawberry Banana Smoothie
  44. Chocolate Cherry Vanilla Almond Smoothie
    • 1/2 cup cherries (fresh or frozen)
    • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 1 tablespoon almond butter
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  45. Mixed Berry Vanilla Yogurt Smoothie
    • 1/2 cup mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    • 1/2 cup vanilla yogurt (sugar free)
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  46. Chocolate Avocado Vanilla Smoothie
  47. Vanilla Orange Berry Smoothie
    • 1/2 orange, peeled and segmented
    • 1/2 cup mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  48. Chocolate Banana Berry Smoothie
  49. Vanilla Berry Spinach Smoothie
    • Handful of spinach leaves
    • 1/2 cup mixed berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries)
    • 20 grams of vanilla protein powder
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)
  50. Chocolate Raspberry Vanilla Greek Yogurt Smoothie
    • 1/2 cup raspberries (fresh or frozen)
    • 20 grams of chocolate protein powder
    • tablespoon cocoa powder
    • 1/2 cup vanilla Greek yogurt (sugar free)
    • 2 cups of milk, plant milk, or water
    • Ice cubes (optional)

Lactose Free Dairy Free Protein Shakes

If you’re looking to lose weight and/or gain muscle using protein shakes, without the unpleasant side effects that come from lactose / milk / dairy, then we’ve got you covered!

In this article, we’ll share:

  • Why so many people can’t digest lactose from dairy products properly (and the potential health implications).
  • What protein powders are best for lactose intolerance.
  • How to find the best dairy / lactose free protein shakes for you.
  • 8 delicious, non dairy protein shakes ideas you can make today to help with weight loss.

Let’s get started!

What Is Lactose Intolerance?

Lactose is a type of sugar found in milk and dairy products. Many people can’t digest lactose due to a deficiency in lactase, the enzyme responsible for breaking down lactose in the digestive system. This condition is known as lactose intolerance.

When you’re lactose intolerant, you can’t fully digest lactose in milk and other dairy-based foods and drinks. This can lead to symptoms like diarrhea, gas and bloating after eating or drinking dairy products.

Lactose intolerance affects an estimated 36% of Americans and 68% of the world population.lactose free protein shakes

Causes of Lactose Intolerance

According to the Mayo Clinic:

Too little of an enzyme produced in your small intestine (lactase) is usually responsible for lactose intolerance. You can have low levels of lactase and still be able to digest milk products. But if your levels are too low you become lactose intolerant, leading to symptoms after you eat or drink dairy.

Lactose intolerance primarily arises from genetic factors that influence lactase production:

  • Primary lactose intolerance: The most common type, where lactase production decreases after weaning, following the natural course in most mammals. This reduction can lead to symptoms when consuming dairy products.
  • Secondary lactose intolerance: This can occur due to injuries or diseases affecting the small intestine, such as celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, or infections, leading to a temporary decrease in lactase production.
  • Developmental lactose intolerance: Seen in premature infants born before their intestines fully develop; this is usually temporary.
  • Congenital lactose intolerance: A very rare condition where babies produce little to no lactase enzyme from birth due to a genetic mutation.

Certain diseases that affect the digestive systems (including Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease), stomach or intestinal infections, and injuries to the small intestine (from surgery, trauma, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy) may reduce the amount of the digestive enzyme lactase available to process lactose properly.

Geographic and Ethnic Variations

The ability to digest lactose beyond infancy varies widely and is influenced by historical dietary patterns:

  • High lactase persistence rates (ability to digest lactose into adulthood) are found in populations with a long history of domesticating dairy animals and consuming their milk, like those in northern Europe and some African and Middle Eastern groups.
  • Lower rates are seen in East Asian, West African, Arab, Jewish, Italian, and Greek populations, where historical dairy consumption has been minimal.

Symptoms and Health Implications

When lactose isn’t adequately digested, it moves into the colon, where bacteria ferment it, producing gas and attracting water. This can lead to:

  • Digestive symptoms: Bloating, diarrhea, gas, and abdominal pain.
  • Nutritional concerns: If avoiding dairy products without suitable replacements, there might be deficiencies in calcium, vitamin D, riboflavin, and protein.

Managing Lactose Intolerance

  • Dietary adjustments: Limiting or avoiding dairy products, using lactose-free alternatives, or consuming small amounts of dairy with meals can help.
  • Lactase supplements: These can be taken before consuming dairy to aid digestion.
  • Calcium and vitamin D supplementation: Important if dairy intake is reduced.

What Types of Foods Are High in Lactose?

High lactose foods include the usual suspects like milk, cheese, ice cream, yogurt, and other dairy products. But lactose is often hiding in common grocery store foods like bread and baked goods, chocolate and many types of candy, salad dressings and sauces, breakfast cereals and cereal bars, instant potatoes, soups, rice and noodle mixes, lunch meats, mixes for pancakes, biscuits, and cookies, margarine and butter.

Most people also don’t realize that lactose is also present in about 20% of prescription medications, such as birth control pills (oral contraceptives), and about 6% of over-the-counter medications, including many tablets for stomach acid and gas.

So if you’re on a lactose-free diet, it’s important to scrutinize ingredient lists and food labels.

What Dairy Free Protein Powders and Shakes Are Best for Lactose Intolerance?

Most milk-based protein powders, including whey protein, contain lactose. So it comes as no surprise that these types of animal proteins can lead to gut disturbances for folks who are lactose intolerant.

There are certain whey protein powder brands that are lactose-free and/or contain the digestive enzyme lactase, which helps your body break down lactose. But it’s up to you the consumer to determine if these products are actually “non-dairy” like they claim to be.

Vegan / plant based protein powders are completely free of any dairy, so these may be a safer / more suitable option if you’re trying to avoid lactose.

How to Find the Best Lactose Free Protein Powders and Shakes for Your Health Needs

First off, what are your health goals? What do you want your protein powder to do for you?

Help you feel better?

Look better?

Lose weight?

Do you care where the ingredients come from and if they’re organic? Or is cost more important to you?

For example, I choose supplements that help me look and feel better. I want my supplements to be organic whenever possible, free of dairy and other allergens, and have no sugar added (because added sugar is one of the biggest causes of weight gain).

I also look for ingredients grown in the U.S. and Canada instead of China, where most brands source their ingredients from.

So determine what your top 3-4 most important criteria are, and then find a protein powder that fits your needs. It takes a little work, in full disclosure, because most of the top selling brands have ingredients that come from China, added sugar, and hidden junk that may not be dairy free.

Our Favorite Lactose and Dairy Free Protein Shakes

We used our protein powder, Pure Food, for these smoothie recipes, but any non-dairy protein powder option will work (as long as it doesn’t contain added sugar).

dairy lactose free protein shake recipes

50 Vanilla and Chocolate Dairy Free High Protein Smoothie Recipes

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Healthier Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups-Low Sugar

I love Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups.

I don’t, however, love the 11 grams of sugar per cup or the lengthy list of artificial, inflammation-promoting ingredients:

Milk Chocolate [Sugar, Cocoa Butter, Chocolate, Non-Fat Milk, Milk Fat, Lactose, Lecithin (Soy), PGPR, Emulsifier], Peanuts, Sugar, Dextrose, Partially Defatted Peanuts, Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil [Palm Kernel Oil, Soybean Oil], Contains 2% of Less of: Corn Syrup, Contains 2% of Less of: Salt, Contains 2% of Less of: Palm Kernel Oil, Contains 2% of Less of: Artificial Color (Yellow 5 Lake, Yellow 6 Lake, Red 40 Lake, Blue 1 Lake), Contains 2% of Less of: Confectioner’s Glaze, Contains 2% of Less of: Lecithin (Soy), Contains 2% of Less of: Modified Corn Starch, Contains 2% of Less of: TBHQ and Citric Acid, Contains 2% of Less of: To Maintain Freshness, Contains 2% of Less of: Carnauba Wax, Contains 2% of Less of: Vanillin, Contains 2% of Less of: Artificial Flavor.

So I decided to create a healthier chocolate peanut butter cups recipe.

Let’s compare this recipe to Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups:

  1. Higher in protein (6 grams vs. 2 grams).
  2. Lower in sugar (4.5 grams vs. 11 grams).
  3. Contains only all-natural, plant-based ingredients (no dairy, soy, or gluten).

Now, a quick disclaimer: this peanut butter cup recipe is higher in fat (16 grams per cup) so moderation is important (as with any sweet treat).

But I’ll substitute a little fat in my diet for sugar any day of the week (particularly from coconut oil, which contains medium chain triglycerides, which may have some health benefits).

Let’s take a look at the ingredients.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Cup Ingredients

*Dairy Free, Gluten Free, Soy Free

Bottom Layer (Chocolate)

Top Layer (Peanut Butter)

  • 1/3 cup all natural, unsweetened peanut butter
  • 2 T coconut oil (melted)
  • 1 T maple syrup or honey
  • 1 tsp. vanilla bean powder or extract

This recipe made about 10 peanut butter cups for me.

How to Make This Healthier Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups Recipe

  1. Mix all ingredients for bottom chocolate layer together in a bowl. You may need to add a tiny bit of water or more coconut oil to get it to the right consistency. It should be just thick enough that you can slowly pour it out of the bowl.
  2. Mix all ingredients for the top layer in a separate bowl.
  3. Grease your cupcake tray (I used a flexible silicon 12-cup tray but any will work).
  4. Scoop the bottom layer equally among the 10 cups, followed by the top layer.
  5. Put the tray in the freezer for at least 2 hours (make sure it sits flat…if your tray is flexibly, you may need to set it on a baking sheet before putting in the freezer).

Make sure you keep any leftovers in the freezer.

Nutrition Facts

Servings: 10

Per Serving:

Calories: 193

Fat: 16 grams

Carbs: 9 grams (2 grams of fiber, 4.5 grams of sugar)

Protein: 6 grams

 

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Plant Based Protein Pudding Recipe (Vegan, Keto, Low Sugar)

Creating a healthy and tasty chocolate plant-based pudding recipe that was vegan, keto-friendly, and high protein was quite the challenge, let me tell you!

But I can confidently declare this one a winner … and it has very solid nutrition facts profile, as you’ll see below.

The highest percentage of calories in this recipe come from fat (29 grams). But don’t fret–it’s good fats (monounsatured and polyunsaturated)–the types that have a beneficial effect on your heart health.

These “good fats” in the recipe come from three nuts that pair surprisingly well together: cashews, macadamia, and peanut butter.

And the protein content ain’t too shabby either–18 grams per serving thanks to the addition of Pure Food Cacao Protein Powder with Probiotics.

For all of you low carb / Paleo / Keto peeps, the carb count comes in at 17 with 4 grams of belly-filling fiber … for a grand total of 13 g net carbs and just 1 gram of sugar!

You could lower this even more by switching up your nut ratios and doing more macadamia/nut butter and less cashews.

Let’s take a look at the ingredients.

Chocolate Plant Based Protein Pudding Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups unsweetened oat milk
  • 1 cup cashews (soaked overnight)
  • 1/2 cup macadamia nuts (soaked overnight)
  • 1/8 cup peanut butter
  • 4 scoops of Pure Food Cacao Protein Powder with Probiotics (note: you can also try 3 scoops of Pure Food Cacao REAL MEAL Meal Replacement Powder).
  • Optional: If you like it sweeter, you can add a banana, 1-2 T sweetener like honey or maple syrup, or a tiny bit of monkfruit or stevia if you prefer lower sugar, which is what I used. Or try it with shaved dark chocolate and/or strawberries.

How to Make This Keto-friendly Chocolate Vegan Protein Pudding

  1. Start by combining the macadamia nuts and cashews into a bowl. Cover and soak overnight or give them a “quick soak” by adding near-boiling-hot water and soaking for 1 hour. Overnight will get you a smoother consistency though. Drain the water once done.
  2. Add the rest of your dry ingredients to a food processor or high powered blender (I used my Vitamix) and pulse. Slowly add the oat milk a little bit at a time until you get the consistency you’re looking for (taste frequently!). I blended mine for about 2-3 minutes on medium.
  3. Scoop the pudding into a bowl. Cover and chill overnight, ideally (or at least a couple hours if you can wait that long). Serve as-is or with some fruit/dark chocolate and you have yourself a very tasty and healthy dessert!
  4. This plant-powered protein pudding will keep in the fridge for 3-4 days. You can probably freeze it too, but I haven’t tried so proceed at your own risk! 😉

Nutrition Facts

Servings: 4

Per Serving:

Calories: 387

Fat: 29 grams

Carbs: 17 grams (4 grams of fiber, 1 gram of sugar)

Protein: 18 grams

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Grain Free Vegan Protein Balls

vegan grain free protein balls recipe

It’s not often you find a protein balls recipe that’s vegan, grain-free, Paleo / keto-friendly, has no added sugar, requires no baking, and still tastes delicious.

But that’s exactly what we’re bringing you with this new recipe. As you’ll see on our recipes page, we’ve made several variations of protein balls before but this one is quite unique.

It has a combo of several “superfood” nuts and seeds, including pistachios, walnuts, flax, chia, and coconut. Toss in some Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder with Probiotics and you get a nutritious, guilt-free snack or dessert that kiddos will enjoy too (my 6-year-old had a blast preparing and eating these, as you’ll see in the pics that follow).

Health-wise, here are just a few of the perks:

Health Benefits:

Ingredient

Health Benefits

Walnuts Walnuts can help you improve cognitive (brain) function and also reduce the risk of other diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, depression, and type 2 diabetes, which are risk factors for the development of dementia.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7071526/

Pistachios Pistachios have a high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential. Among nuts, pistachios also have a lower fat and energy content and the highest levels of K, γ-tocopherol, vitamin K, phytosterols, xanthophyll carotenoids, certain minerals (Cu, Fe and Mg), vitamin B₆ and thiamin.

Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26148925/

Flax Flaxseed is a rich source of the omega-3 fatty acid, alpha linolenic acid, the lignan secoisolariciresinol diglucoside and fiber. These compounds provide bioactivity of value to the health of animals and humans through their anti-inflammatory action, anti-oxidative capacity and lipid modulating properties.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6567199/

Coconut Coconut meat contains MCT oil, or medium-chain triglycerides. That’s the extract that people put in smoothies and coffee. MCT oil has unique benefits. It seems to lower two key hunger hormones, cueing a person to eat less. And MCTs convert more easily into energy compared with other sources of fat, like animal meat, so athletes consider it workout fuel.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4192077/

Chia Chia seeds contain healthy Omega-3 fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, dietary fiber, proteins, vitamins, and minerals. Aside from this, the seeds are an excellent source of polyphenols and antioxidants, such as caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid, myricetin, quercetin, and others.

Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31861466/

Dates Studies have shown that dates have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour properties.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3992385/

Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder Pure Food Plant-based Protein Powder contains a multi-source protein blend that’s just as effective as whey with the digestive side effects. And unlike other plant proteins, it’s 100% organic, high in fiber and contains no sugar.

Protein Balls Ingredients:

1 cup walnuts
1/2 cup pistachios (shells removed, of course)
1/3 cup flax meal
1/4 cup shredded coconut
1 T chia seeds
4 dates
1 T coconut oil (or other oil for greasing your pan)
1 tsp. vanilla powder or extract (optional)
Flaked salt (optional)

 

Directions:

  1. If your dates are hard or dry, place them in a bowl of hot water and cover to rehydrate. Let ’em sit for 5-10 minutes, then drain and pat dry.
  2. Add the walnuts and pistachios to a food processor and pulse for a minute or two until the nuts reach a fine “meal” consistency (there should be no visible large chunks remaining).
  3. Remove the seeds from the dates and add to the food processor. Pulse until they’re fully chopped (about a minute should do).
  4. Add the remaining ingredients, along with 1-2 T of water. Note: add the water 1 Tablespoon at a time. You will only need a little bit to make your mixture nice and sticky for rolling.
  5. Once all ingredients are thoroughly mixed and the mix feels slightly wet, grease your pan and start rolling into balls.
  6. Refrigerate or freeze for at least 1-2 hours before serving.

These will last for 7-10 days if you keep them refrigerated.

Nutrition:

Assuming you make 10 protein balls with this recipe, here are the nutrition facts for each ball:

Calories: 155

Fat: 12 grams

Carbs: 7 grams

Fiber: 3 grams

Protein: 6 grams

vegan grain free protein balls recipe

no bake protein balls

Try This Vanilla Apple Berry Smoothie Recipe Now

vanilla berry plant based smoothie recipe

I’ve been experimenting with some new smoothie recipes and this one was too good not to share!

It’s high in protein, loaded with antioxidants, and delicious!

Plus just 6 simple ingredients with no junk your body doesn’t need.

It’s the perfect way to satisfy your sweet tooth without the guilt.

Ingredients/Instructions:

  • 2-3 scoops of Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder
  • 1/2 banana
  • 1 apple (cored)
  • 1 cup of frozen blueberries
  • 1/2 cup of frozen cherries
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • Add ice and water to your taste and blend

This recipe will get you enough to feed a family of 4 (or some extra servings just for you).

vanilla plant based smoothie recipes

Try it out and let us know what you think!

Protein Brownies (Healthy, Low Sugar, Vegan, Dairy and Gluten Free)

If you’re looking for a healthy brownie treat you don’t have to feel guilty about, you’ve come to the right place.

Now, my criteria for “healthy” is admittedly a bit more stringent than most.

So this is definitely not a sugar bomb like your typical brownie. But check out these impressive nutrition #s:

  • 247 calories
  • 10 g protein
  • 6 g fiber
  • 4 g sugar

And not only it is low in sugar, it’s free of dairy, gluten, and soy … perfect for vegan, vegetarians, and anyone with food intolerances!

Here’s the recipe:

Homemade Healthy High Protein Brownie Recipe

What’s In It:

1 cup applesauce
1 cup oat flour
~1 cup chocolate protein powder (I used 8 scoops of Pure Food Cacao Protein)
1 tsp. vanilla extract (or real vanilla bean powder if you can afford it)
1/4 tsp. salt
2 T coconut oil (divided into two 1 T servings)
optional: 1/4 crushed nuts like walnuts or pecans (I used 1/4 cup walnuts)
optional: dark chocolate chips (I chopped up 1/4 of an Alter Eco Blackout Bar for this recipe, which has 90% cacao content)**

How to Make It:

  1. To make your own applesauce, blend the 2 peeled and cored apples with 1.5 cups of water.
  2. Add the oat flour, protein, vanilla, salt, 1 T coconut oil (and nuts and dark chocolate if you go that route). Mix thoroughly.
  3. Grease an 8″ x 8″ pan with the remaining T of coconut oil. Spread the mixture evenly onto pan.
  4. Cook at 325 degrees F for 20-25 min.
  5. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours then cut into 9 bars.

Nutrition Facts (per brownie)*:

  • 247 calories
  • 9 g fat
  • 31 g carbs (6 g fiber, 4 g sugar**)
  • 10 g protein

**If you like yours a little sweeter, add a little honey, coconut sugar, maple syrup, or stevia to the recipe.

Homemade Paleo Protein Bar Recipe (Vegan, Dairy Free, Gluten Free)

If you’re a clean eater, you know how hard it is to find a good healthy protein bar these days. Most contain some type of junk your body just doesn’t need: dairy, gluten, soy, sugar (in many cases, unfortunately, it’s all of the above).

My criteria for a “healthy” protein bar are quite simple. It should have:

1.) Only organic, real food ingredients, and

2.) No added sweeteners. Sugar should come from only real fruit sources like dried fruit … I don’t touch anything with over 10 grams.

If you want to make your own healthy protein bar, here’s one of my favorite recipes.

Homemade Healthy Protein Bar Recipe

What’s In It:

  • 1/4 cup organic quick cook rolled oats
  • 4 scoops raw cacao protein powder (make sure you choose a high quality vegan protein)
  • 1 cup organic nut butter (I used peanut but any nut butter will work)*
  • 1/4 cup organic pumpkin seeds
  • 1/4 cup organic dates, chopped into small pieces.
  • 1.5 cups organic coconut cream (or 1.5 cups coconut milk powder and 3/4 cup warm water)**
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • Dark chocolate shavings (optional)***

*I recommend organic nut butters with a maximum of two ingredients: nuts and salt. If yours has other oils or added sugar, look for another brand.

**Most coconut creams have some type of gum or filler added. I prefer to buy organic coconut milk powder on Amazon and mix it with water. Native Forest coconut cream.

**I recommend an organic dark chocolate bar with 70% cacao content or higher, 5 grams of sugar or less, and no soy (you’d be surprised how many of them have it … check the ingredients list).

How to Make It:*

  1. Whip the coconut cream until smooth.
  2. Stir in the almond flour and let sit for 20 minutes.
  3. Stir in almond/peanut butter, dates, salt, pumpkin seeds, and protein powder. Mix thoroughly by hand (or pulse in a food processor).
  4. Spread the mixture evenly into a pan or baking dish lined with parchment paper.
  5. Refrigerate overnight then cut into 8 bars.

*I used a mixer for steps 1-3 but you can do it by hand too.

Nutrition Facts (per bar)*:

  • 299 calories
  • 19 g fat
  • 18 g carbs (4 g fiber, 6 g sugar**)
  • 15 g protein

*I cut it into 8 bars. At ~300 calories a bar, you can cut it into 16 if you prefer something closer to 150 calories (it’s still filling too!)

**If you want to cut down the sugar content, cut back even more on the dates. To sweeten it up, add more dates or a dab of raw honey.

Low Sugar Dairy Free Protein Bar Recipe

If you’re sensitive to dairy and/or gluten, it’s darn near impossible to find a healthy, low sugar protein bar without a million additives and so-called “natural” ingredients you can’t pronounce.

But this dairy free protein bar meets all those criteria and more.

First, let’s talk about what’s not in it. These DIY protein bars are free of:

  • Dairy and animal milk ingredients
  • Gluten
  • Soy
  • Added sugar
  • Junk ingredients and additives like “flavors“, gums, and other fillers

Each bar is just over 250 calories, with 10 grams of protein, 5 grams of fiber, and just 3 grams of sugar.

Try this low sugar, high fiber treat that’s perfect for people of all ages (including kids … my toddler definitely approves)!

Healthy Dairy Free Protein Bars

Ingredients

  • 2 cups oat flour
  • 1/2 cup cashew or almond butter
  • 1/2 cup cashew or almond milk
  • 5 dried dates
  • 1/4 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/2 dark chocolate bar (we used Alter Eco Blackout Chocolate)
  • 2 T coconut oil
  • 6 scoops all-natural plant-based protein powder (like Pure Food Raw Cacao)

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients except chocolate bar and coconut oil in a food processor. Process until mixed thoroughly, about 2-3 minutes.
  2. Melt the chocolate and coconut oil together in a small sauce pan.
  3. Spread batter on a parchment lined baking sheet or pan.
  4. Top with chocolate/coconut and freeze for several hours before serving.

Nutrition (Per Bar)

*Note: This Recipe Makes ~10 Dairy Free Protein Bars

257 calories
15 g fat
10 g protein
22 g carbs (5 g fiber, 3 g sugar)

No Bake Chocolate Peanut Butter Protein Bites Recipe

no bake protein bites recipe

Chocolate + peanut butter. The two were definitely made for one another. And today I’m going to show you how to create something magical with those ingredients that’s actually good for you.

This healthy no bake protein bites recipe is:

  • Dairy free
  • Gluten free
  • High in fiber
  • High in protein
  • Low in sugar
  • Delicious!

It’s perfect for those of us who can’t tolerate (or choose not to eat) dairy and gluten. And best off: no cooking or baking skills required, which means it’s really simple and nutritious.

Let’s get to the recipe!

No Bake Protein Bites Recipe Ingredients

  1. 1 cup peanut butter (I used plain organic peanut butter with no salt added. Any nut butter will work though.)
  2. 3/4 cup oats
  3. 1 T hemp seeds
  4. 1 T chia seeds
  5. 1/2 dark chocolate bar (chopped into chocolate chip-sized pieces). I used Alter Eco Blackout Chocolate. In general, the higher the % of cacao is, the lower the sugar content will be.
  6. 4 scoops of Pure Food Raw Cacao Protein Powder
  7. 1 T honey (optional, depending on how sweet you like it)
  8. 1 cup water (or plant milk)
  9. 2 T shredded coconut (optional)

**Makes ~16 protein bites

How to Make the Protein Bites

  1. Put all ingredients in a food processor and turn it on for 30-60 seconds.
  2. Form the dough into balls (this recipe makes around 16 protein bites).
  3. Sprinkle with coconut, if desired.
  4. Refrigerate whatever protein bites you don’t eat right away. 😉

Nutrition Facts (Per Protein Bite)

134 calories

8 grams of fat

11 g carbs (3 g sugar, 3 g fiber)

6 g protein

chocolate protein balls

Get more healthy high protein recipes here.