Tag Archives: recipes

Protein Brownies (Healthy, Low Sugar, Vegan, Dairy and Gluten Free)

If you’re looking for a healthy brownie treat you don’t have to feel guilty about, you’ve come to the right place.

Now, my criteria for “healthy” is admittedly a bit more stringent than most.

So this is definitely not a sugar bomb like your typical brownie. But check out these impressive nutrition #s:

  • 247 calories
  • 10 g protein
  • 6 g fiber
  • 4 g sugar

And not only it is low in sugar, it’s free of dairy, gluten, and soy … perfect for vegan, vegetarians, and anyone with food intolerances!

Here’s the recipe:

Homemade Healthy High Protein Brownie Recipe

What’s In It:

1 cup applesauce
1 cup oat flour
~1 cup chocolate protein powder (I used 8 scoops of Pure Food Cacao Protein)
1 tsp. vanilla extract (or real vanilla bean powder if you can afford it)
1/4 tsp. salt
2 T coconut oil (divided into two 1 T servings)
optional: 1/4 crushed nuts like walnuts or pecans (I used 1/4 cup walnuts)
optional: dark chocolate chips (I chopped up 1/4 of an Alter Eco Blackout Bar for this recipe, which has 90% cacao content)**

How to Make It:

  1. To make your own applesauce, blend the 2 peeled and cored apples with 1.5 cups of water.
  2. Add the oat flour, protein, vanilla, salt, 1 T coconut oil (and nuts and dark chocolate if you go that route). Mix thoroughly.
  3. Grease an 8″ x 8″ pan with the remaining T of coconut oil. Spread the mixture evenly onto pan.
  4. Cook at 325 degrees F for 20-25 min.
  5. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours then cut into 9 bars.

Nutrition Facts (per brownie)*:

  • 247 calories
  • 9 g fat
  • 31 g carbs (6 g fiber, 4 g sugar**)
  • 10 g protein

**If you like yours a little sweeter, add a little honey, coconut sugar, maple syrup, or stevia to the recipe.

Homemade Paleo Protein Bar Recipe (Vegan, Dairy Free, Gluten Free)

If you’re a clean eater, you know how hard it is to find a good healthy protein bar these days. Most contain some type of junk your body just doesn’t need: dairy, gluten, soy, sugar (in many cases, unfortunately, it’s all of the above).

My criteria for a “healthy” protein bar are quite simple. It should have:

1.) Only organic, real food ingredients, and

2.) No added sweeteners. Sugar should come from only real fruit sources like dried fruit … I don’t touch anything with over 10 grams.

If you want to make your own healthy protein bar, here’s one of my favorite recipes.

Homemade Healthy Protein Bar Recipe

What’s In It:

  • 1/4 cup organic quick cook rolled oats
  • 4 scoops raw cacao protein powder (make sure you choose a high quality vegan protein)
  • 1 cup organic nut butter (I used peanut but any nut butter will work)*
  • 1/4 cup organic pumpkin seeds
  • 1/4 cup organic dates, chopped into small pieces.
  • 1.5 cups organic coconut cream (or 1.5 cups coconut milk powder and 3/4 cup warm water)**
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • Dark chocolate shavings (optional)***

*I recommend organic nut butters with a maximum of two ingredients: nuts and salt. If yours has other oils or added sugar, look for another brand.

**Most coconut creams have some type of gum or filler added. I prefer to buy organic coconut milk powder on Amazon and mix it with water. Native Forest coconut cream.

**I recommend an organic dark chocolate bar with 70% cacao content or higher, 5 grams of sugar or less, and no soy (you’d be surprised how many of them have it … check the ingredients list).

How to Make It:*

  1. Whip the coconut cream until smooth.
  2. Stir in the almond flour and let sit for 20 minutes.
  3. Stir in almond/peanut butter, dates, salt, pumpkin seeds, and protein powder. Mix thoroughly by hand (or pulse in a food processor).
  4. Spread the mixture evenly into a pan or baking dish lined with parchment paper.
  5. Refrigerate overnight then cut into 8 bars.

*I used a mixer for steps 1-3 but you can do it by hand too.

Nutrition Facts (per bar)*:

  • 299 calories
  • 19 g fat
  • 18 g carbs (4 g fiber, 6 g sugar**)
  • 15 g protein

*I cut it into 8 bars. At ~300 calories a bar, you can cut it into 16 if you prefer something closer to 150 calories (it’s still filling too!)

**If you want to cut down the sugar content, cut back even more on the dates. To sweeten it up, add more dates or a dab of raw honey.

Low Sugar Dairy Free Protein Bar Recipe

If you’re sensitive to dairy and/or gluten, it’s darn near impossible to find a healthy, low sugar protein bar without a million additives and so-called “natural” ingredients you can’t pronounce.

But this dairy free protein bar meets all those criteria and more.

First, let’s talk about what’s not in it. These DIY protein bars are free of:

  • Dairy and animal milk ingredients
  • Gluten
  • Soy
  • Added sugar
  • Junk ingredients and additives like “flavors“, gums, and other fillers

Each bar is just over 250 calories, with 10 grams of protein, 5 grams of fiber, and just 3 grams of sugar.

Try this low sugar, high fiber treat that’s perfect for people of all ages (including kids … my toddler definitely approves)!

Healthy Dairy Free Protein Bars

Ingredients

  • 2 cups oat flour
  • 1/2 cup cashew or almond butter
  • 1/2 cup cashew or almond milk
  • 5 dried dates
  • 1/4 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/2 dark chocolate bar (we used Alter Eco Blackout Chocolate)
  • 2 T coconut oil
  • 6 scoops all-natural plant-based protein powder (like Pure Food Raw Cacao)

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients except chocolate bar and coconut oil in a food processor. Process until mixed thoroughly, about 2-3 minutes.
  2. Melt the chocolate and coconut oil together in a small sauce pan.
  3. Spread batter on a parchment lined baking sheet or pan.
  4. Top with chocolate/coconut and freeze for several hours before serving.

Nutrition (Per Bar)

*Note: This Recipe Makes ~10 Dairy Free Protein Bars

257 calories
15 g fat
10 g protein
22 g carbs (5 g fiber, 3 g sugar)

No Bake Chocolate Peanut Butter Protein Bites Recipe

no bake protein bites recipe

Chocolate + peanut butter. The two were definitely made for one another. And today I’m going to show you how to create something magical with those ingredients that’s actually good for you.

This healthy no bake protein bites recipe is:

  • Dairy free
  • Gluten free
  • High in fiber
  • High in protein
  • Low in sugar
  • Delicious!

It’s perfect for those of us who can’t tolerate (or choose not to eat) dairy and gluten. And best off: no cooking or baking skills required, which means it’s really simple and nutritious.

Let’s get to the recipe!

No Bake Protein Bites Recipe Ingredients

  1. 1 cup peanut butter (I used plain organic peanut butter with no salt added. Any nut butter will work though.)
  2. 3/4 cup oats
  3. 1 T hemp seeds
  4. 1 T chia seeds
  5. 1/2 dark chocolate bar (chopped into chocolate chip-sized pieces). I used Alter Eco Blackout Chocolate. In general, the higher the % of cacao is, the lower the sugar content will be.
  6. 4 scoops of Pure Food Raw Cacao Protein Powder
  7. 1 T honey (optional, depending on how sweet you like it)
  8. 1 cup water (or plant milk)
  9. 2 T shredded coconut (optional)

**Makes ~16 protein bites

How to Make the Protein Bites

  1. Put all ingredients in a food processor and turn it on for 30-60 seconds.
  2. Form the dough into balls (this recipe makes around 16 protein bites).
  3. Sprinkle with coconut, if desired.
  4. Refrigerate whatever protein bites you don’t eat right away. 😉

Nutrition Facts (Per Protein Bite)

134 calories

8 grams of fat

11 g carbs (3 g sugar, 3 g fiber)

6 g protein

chocolate protein balls

Get more healthy high protein recipes here.

How to Use Pure Food for Best Results (Healthy Smoothie and Food Recipes Included)

In this post, I’m going to show you how hundreds of others have used Pure Food to produce some pretty awesome results.

Whether you want to lose weight, put on some lean muscle, improve your energy levels, or most importantly, feel better, I’m confident the recipes and techniques I’m going to share below will help you.

There are lots of recipes in this post. I split them up between 1.) Smoothies and 2.) Food. I will continue to update it constantly, so bookmark it so you can come back if you need some inspiration!

Without further ado …

How to Use Pure Food Protein Powder in Smoothies

how to use Pure Food protein powderFirst off, use a blender for best results. The powder will mix okay on its own but it’ll taste smoother coming out of the blender.

Since Pure Food has only clean, healthy ingredients without the fillers, so-called natural flavors, and sweeteners other plant protein brands use, the taste is earthy and natural and your taste buds and gut may need time to acclimate. Start with one serving (10 grams) or less and work your way up from there.

Also, make sure the package is sealed between each use. We don’t use preservatives and although the product has a two-year shelf life, it’s real food, so the sooner you use it, the better it’ll taste. I keep mine in the refrigerator to preserve more nutrients (but you don’t have to).

GIVE PURE FOOD TIME TO WORK
Pure Food will help you feel better and you will experience noticeable improvements in your health if you give it time to work. 

I recommend at least 14 days to allow the probiotics time to colonize in your gut. The probiotic strain we use, by the way, has been clinically shown to boost immunity, improve gut health, and help your body digest plant proteins better.

Like any good health or fitness product (and it should go without saying), you need to make a commitment to yourself by eating cleaner and exercising if you really want to see results fast.

Pure Food Smoothie / Juice / Liquid Recipes

Here are some of my favorite smoothie and juice recipes using both Pure Food Cacao and Vanilla Protein:

Simple Chocolate Banana Smoothie

Cacao Chia Berry Blast

  • 1 scoop Pure Food Cacao Protein Powder
  • 1/2 cup frozen organic berries
  • 1 T organic chia seeds (flax, hemp, or pumpkin work too)
  • Handful of ice
  • 2 cups of water (or almond or coconut milk)

Chocolate Fat Burning Smoothie

Chocolate Meal Replacement Smoothie

  • 2 scoops Pure Food Cacao Protein Powder
  • 1/2 banana
  • 2 T organic oat flour
  • 1 T organic coconut oil
  • 1 T extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups of water
  • Ice (start with a small handful and add more depending on how thick you like it)

Want 3 More Pure Food Meal Replacement Recipes? Grab These Free Recipe Cards

Vanilla Berry Blast

Tropical Superfood Smoothie

  • 1 scoop Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder
  • 1/4 cup frozen mango
  • 1/4 cup frozen organic cherries
  • 1/4 cup pineapple
  • 1 tsp. fresh turmeric
  • 12 oz. water or almond milk

Strawberry Banana Green Smoothie

  • 1/2 scoop Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder
  • 1/2 banana
  • 1/2 cup frozen organic strawberries
  • 1 handful organic greens (spinach, kale, chard, etc.)
  • 3-4 ice cubes
  • 12 oz. water or almond milk

See more Pure Food Smoothie recipes on Instagram

Food

Some of these recipes were sent to us by customers and others were created by yours truly. You’ll find tasty-yet-healthy overnight oats, protein balls, cookies, brownies … even bread for all you carb-lovers.

Some of these recipes require baking and some don’t. Cooking/high heat denatures some of the nutrients in any food, including Pure Food, so I cook with mine sparingly.

But these recipes are a nutritious way to satisfy your sweet tooth (disclaimer: they’re not going to taste the exact same as their “regular” sugar- and junk-filled counterpart). With that said, we think they’re pretty darn good.

Pure Food Solid Food Recipes

no bake protein barNo-bake Protein Balls

No-Bake Protein Bars

Protein Muffins

Protein Pudding (or Ice Cream)

Chocolate Chip Vegan Cookies

Protein Pancakes

Healthy “Brownies”

Protein Bread

If you have additional recipe ideas, questions, or comments about how you use Pure Food, please share them with me by  emailing me directly at Scott@purefoodcompany.com

Enjoy!

Scott Christ

Founder, Pure Food Co.

Pure Food Healthy High Protein Muffins Recipe

One of our awesome Pure Food customers Traci shared this Pure Food protein muffins recipe with me and it was too good not to share.

Traci hails from Naw’lens, Lousiana (I bet people from New Orleans get annoyed with that real quick). She says she whipped up these healthy muffins as a cleaner, healthier alternative to beignets.

I made a few modifications with the ingredients I had on hand that I noted below (I still included the original recipe though).

Best part is, this high protein muffin recipe is nutritious. It’s low in sugar, high in fiber, and is soy, dairy, and gluten free … pretty awesome!

Here’s the ingredients and instructions:

Pure Food High Protein Muffins Recipe Ingredients

healthy high protein muffins ingredients1 scoop of Pure Food Vanilla Protein Powder (note: I added 2 scoops)

2 cups of old fashioned oatmeal

1/2 cup of egg whites

1 banana

2 Tablespoons of hemp seeds

2 Tablespoons of chia seeds

2 Tablespoons of unsweetened coconut flakes

1 Tablespoons of light agave (note: I used organic coconut sugar)

1 teaspoon of vanilla extract (note: I used whole vanilla bean powder)

A pinch of pink Himalayan salt (note: I used plain sea salt)

How to Make the Muffins

  1. vanilla protein healthy muffinsMash one banana in a large bowl. Add one scoop of Pure Food Protein powder Vanilla. Stir.
  2. Add Agave (or coconut sugar), Vanilla, Hemp seeds, Chia seeds, and Coconut. Stir.
  3. Add two cups of oatmeal. Stir.
  4. Add egg whites to form a solid dough. Stir.
  5. Sprinkle sea salt.
  6. Take muffin pan. Spray with coconut oil. Create little muffins by rolling dough in your palms. Drop in muffin pan. Bake 8-10 minutes at 380 degrees. (note: I added about 5 minutes of cooking time since my muffins were larger. If you do 8 smaller ones stick with 8-10 minutes and see if they’re done).** 

Keep refrigerated after baked.

If you want them heated, heat them in microwave for 3 minutes at 20% power.

**I made 4 large muffins and ate one as a post-workout snack. As you’ll see below, if you go that route you get a solid 345 calories, 10 grams of fiber, and 19 grams of protein!

Here’s the final product …

gluten free muffin recipes

Nutrition Facts

Calories: 345

Carbs: 46 grams

Fiber: 10 grams

Sugar: 6 grams

Protein: 19 grams

Fat: 11 grams

Check out my other high protein recipes for more inspiration. And if you have a Pure Food recipe you love, please share it with me by replying to this post or shooting me an email at Scott@purefoodcompany.com!

No Bake Chocolate Protein Balls (Vegan, Paleo, Gluten Free)

no bake protein bar

Creating this no-bake chocolate protein balls recipe (that will please both vegan and paleo palettes, by the way) stirred up some hilarious mental images of the classic SNL Schweddy Balls skit.

All jokes aside, these protein balls are made for clean eaters. They contain 100% real food ingredients, no added sugar, and are gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan, and paleo-friendly.

Best of all, there’s no baking required. You just mix all the ingredients together, roll the dough into balls, and refrigerate it.

My Schweddy balls (sorry, couldn’t resist) are a guilt-free dessert too. One ball will only set you back 122 calories, while delivering a healthy balance of carbs, good fats, and protein.

No Bake Chocolate Protein Balls Recipe (Vegan, Paleo, Gluten-free, Dairy-free)

What’s In ‘Em:

  • paleo protein balls ingredients3 scoops Pure Food Raw Cacao protein powder
  • 1/2 cup pecans
  • 1/2 cup almond flour
  • 1/4 cup organic dried dates (chopped into small pieces)
  • 1.5 cups organic coconut cream + 1/4 cup water (or .5 cups organic coconut milk powder and 3/4 cup warm water)
  • 1 oz. organic dark chocolate (at least 70% cacao … here’s a good list of bars if you’re dairy free)
  • 2 T slivered almonds


How to Make ‘Em:

  1. Put the dates in a food processor and turn on for about a minute.
  2. Add pecans and pulse 8-10 times.
  3. Stir in the almond flour, protein powder, and coconut milk powder. Turn on food processor for 1-2 minutes.
  4. Use a sharp knife to chop up dark chocolate into fine shavings and combine with slivered almonds in a bowl.
  5. Roll the dough from the food processor into balls. Roll each chocolate protein ball in the bowl of slivered almonds/dark chocolate shavings.
  6. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and spread your protein balls into 5 rows of 3 (or however many you want).
  7. Refrigerate overnight. They’ll be ready to eat the next day. They should keep in a tupperware in the fridge for about a week.
vegan protein balls
Here’s what the batter looks like.

Nutrition Facts (per ball … this recipes makes 15 balls):

  • 122 calories
  • 9 g fat
  • 9 g carbs (2 g fiber, 5 g sugar)
  • 5 g protein

Here’s the final product:

These chocolate protein balls would be a hit at any holiday party (and gives you a funny ice-breaker starter because someone is sure to mention the Schweddy balls skit). Or just make them as a healthy snack like I did. Either way, you’ll be happy you tried this awesome recipe.

See more recipes like this every day when you follow me on Instagram:

Soylent Ingredients and Nutrition Facts Review and Analysis

Before I get into my ingredients and nutrition facts reviews and analyses for Soylent’s protein products, let me say this …
I love the idea of Soylent: a convenient, inexpensive way to get a full meal.
If you take a closer look at the ingredients and nutrition panel though, there are a few red flags you need to be aware of if you care about the foods you put in your body.

In this Soylent review, you’ll find out exactly why.

Click/tap the links below to jump to each section …

Get Instant Access to My 3 Healthy DIY Soylent Recipe Cards Here


What Is Soylent Made Of? Nutrition Facts and Ingredients Review

I’ve reviewed a lot of different protein powders. If there’s one single piece of advice I can offer when deciding for yourself whether a product is “healthy,” it’s this:

The nutrition facts and ingredients are the only objective sources of truth.

Let’s have a closer look at the nutrition facts for both Soylent bottle (liquid) and pouch (powder). We’ll start with Soylent Drink.

Soylent Drink 2.0 is the current version of their liquid ready-to-drink bottle, which is now available in three flavors: Original, Cacao, and Nectar. 1.8 is the current version of the powdered formula. Here are the nutrition facts labels for each:

Soylent 2.0 Drink Nutrition (Original):

soylent 2.0 nutrition

Soylent 2.0 Drink Nutrition (Cacao):

is soylent healthy

Soylent 2.0 Drink Nutrition (Nectar):

soylent nectar nutrition facts

Soylent 1.8 Powder Nutrition Facts:

soylent 1.8 powder nutrition facts

Upon first glance, you might think these are healthy.

Here’s where this review gets a little ugly though if you’re a Soylent fan.

Each “meal” has between 9 and 15 grams of added sugar. Newly proposed recommendations provided by the WHO encourage limiting added sugar to less than 5% of your total energy intake each day. That’s just 100 calories’ worth of sugar (or around 25 grams) for someone who eats 2,000 calories per day!

So 60% of the sugar you’re supposed to eat in an entire day is in a single serving of Soylent Powder!

According to Soylent’s website:

The Soylent recipe is based on the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and is regulated as a food by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Uh, call me crazy, but where does the IOM (or any other respectable health organization) recommend 15 grams of added sugar in a single meal?!

But this isn’t even the worst part.

We haven’t gotten to the ingredients yet …

Soylent Ingredients

First, I’ll call your attention to this graphic from Soylent’s website:

soylent review
Thanks, Soylent, for being “transparent” about your low standards for ingredients. Source: www.soylent.com

As you can see, the ingredients in Soylent are:

  1. Not organic (which means there’s a high likelihood there are chemical pesticides and herbicides in your meal replacement shake)
  2. Not kosher-free
  3. Not GMO-free (Soylent actually says their products are “proudly made with GMOs“)
  4. Not allergen-free

Here are the complete ingredient lists for Soylent’s current releases of their Drinks and Powder:

Soylent 2.0 Drink (Original):

soylent ingredients - bottle

Soylent 2.0 Drink (Cacao):

soylent drink - cacao

Soylent 2.0 Drink (Nectar):

soylent nectar ingredient list

Soylent 1.8 Powder Ingredients:

soylent powder ingredients

These sounds more like chemistry experiments than real food.

There’s a lot of cheap fillers and additives in those ingredients lists but I want to call your attention to a few, in particular, you might want to consider avoiding …

Click on the links below to read about the potential dangers and side effects of the following Soylent ingredients. I’ve summed up each in parentheses too.

  • Soy Protein Isolate (cheap protein source usually produced from GMO and chemical-ridden soybeans; derived using petroleum-based hexane; common allergen and cause of inflammation)
  • Natural Flavors (the 4th most common ingredient on food labels; consist of a “natural” extract combined with potentially hundreds of chemical compounds that food companies don’t have to disclose, thanks to the FDA)
  • Maltodextrin (GMO corn-based starch used to thicken processed foods)
  • Soy Lecithin (GMO soy-based thickener/emulsifier that may promote inflammation)
  • Sucralose (artificial sweetener that caused cancer in animal studies; still approved by the FDA for some crazy reason)

What Does Soylent Taste Like?

I didn’t case for the taste for either Soylent bottle (2.0) or pouch (1.8). It’s kind of like a thick, malty mush. Not gag-worthy by any means but not good either. The Cacao and Nectar Drinks tastes better but that’s because they use so-called “natural” flavors (see link above).

I’ve heard that earlier versions were too sweet so they reduced the sweetness level in the latest version. It’s still too sweet for my liking.

Its grey color is a little off-putting for me but this may not be an issue for others.

I realize this is only my opinion about how Soylent tastes and not a very objective answer. If you’d like to hear what others have to say, check out the answers to this question on Quora: What does Soylent taste like?

Soylent Price

One of Soylent’s biggest draws is its cost—it’s pretty cheap. This comes as no surprise when you look at their list of unhealthy, processed junk ingredients.

Here’s how much Soylent costs:

Soylent Drink 2.0 Original Price: 

$34 for 12 bottles ($2.83 per 400 kcal serving) or $32.30 for 12 bottles with a monthly subscription ($2.42 per 400 kcal serving)

Soylent Drink 2.0 Cacao Price:

$39 for 12 bottles ($3.25 per 400 kcal serving) or $37.05 for 12 bottles with a monthly subscription ($3.09 per 400 kcal serving)

Soylent Drink 2.0 Nectar Price: 

$39 for 12 bottles ($3.25 per 400 kcal serving) or $37.05 for 12 bottles with a monthly subscription ($3.09 per 400 kcal serving)

Soylent Powder 1.8 Price:

$64 for 35 meals ($1.83 per 400 kcal serving) or $154 for 35 meals with a monthly subscription ($1.54 per 400 kcal serving).

Soylent Recall

It seems like every time I blink, there’s another Soylent recall …

Soylent recalled their 1.6 Powder in late 2016 after it made a lot of people sick.

Then 1.7 was released after a messy dispute with one of their ingredient suppliers.

Just a month later, they released version 1.8, adding “soluble corn fiber,” which they claim is a “truer source of fiber to the consumer,” whatever that means.

Then 1.8 was recalled due to “undeclared allergens.”

Mistakes happen in the food industry, I get it. But that’s a lot of recalls in a short amount of time.

Soylent Review: The Final Verdict

My Soylent review can be summed up in three words:

Not. Real. Food.

Sure, it satisfies your daily calorie requirements—but it may do your body more harm than good because of all the artificial, processed, junk ingredients.

Look for a meal replacement powder with ingredients sourced from organic whole foods instead.

This is the first of a two-part series. Check out the next post: Healthy DIY Soylent Recipes with Organic, Real Food Ingredients

Healthy High Protein Chocolate Chip Cookie / Brownie Hybrid Recipe

Let me start by saying I’m not known for my baking prowess. My cooking comfort zone is in savory dishes–soups, sauces, salads, and hearty entrees.

Truth is, I don’t have much of a sweet tooth (this is known to happen when you stop eating added sugar). However, I do love to splurge on the occasional bowl of mint chocolate chip ice cream, dark chocolate, or chocolate chip cookie.

The issue with this, as you healthy eaters know, is it’s damn near impossible to find a healthy chocolate chip cookie recipe. Most of the ones I found online still had a boatload of sugar and used some type of refined flour … both no-no’s in my kitchen.

So I decided to create my own recipe for a healthy chocolate chip cookie that was low in sugar and high in protein. The final product turned out more like a cookie/brownie hybrid but it was actually pretty tasty. Here are a some things I did differently to make it healthy:

  • Used a combination of coconut flour and whole grain spelt flour (these are higher in fiber and protein)
  • Used real vanilla bean powder (a nutritional powerhouse packed full of flavor)
  • Used coconut oil instead of butter and vegetable oil (a healthier source of fat)
  • Added a couple scoops of Pure Food Protein
  • Made my own dark chocolate chips by buying a high cacao/low sugar chocolate bar (avoid Godiva and Ghiradelli … they had soy lecithin, a GMO emulsifier, last time I checked)
  • Used organic whole leaf stevia powder instead of added sugar or artificial sugar (I get mine from Mountain Rose Herbs … it’s the same stuff that goes into our protein powder. This is the real, healthy form of stevia because it’s the actual ground up leaves of the plant and nothing else … 99% of “stevia” is junk)

Here’s the rundown of what’s in it, how to make it, and the impressive nutrition stat line:

Healthy High Protein Chocolate Chip Cookie / Brownie Recipe

What’s In It:

  • healthy chocolate chip cookie ingredients3/4 cup coconut flour
  • 1/2 cup whole grain spelt flour (any whole grain flour will do here … try almond meal instead if you need a gluten-free recipe)
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. real vanilla bean powder (the real stuff is super expensive but tastes phenomenal … organic vanilla extract works too though)
  • 4 T coconut oil, divided
  • 1 cup coconut/cashew/almond milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 scoops Pure Food Protein
  • 1 (3.5 oz.) dark chocolate bar (the higher cacao content, the better. I recommend at least 70% cacao … I used 85%)
  • 1/4 cup pistachios (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp. stevia leaf powder (optional … I used just a tiny pinch but I don’t like things overly sweet … taste the mixture to see if it’s sweetened to your liking then add more stevia little-by-little as your heart desires)

How to Make It:

  1. Mix the egg, flours, and coconut milk together thoroughly with a whisk or mixer.
  2. Use a large chef’s knife to cut the chocolate bar into chocolate chip-sized pieces.
  3. Add the baking soda, baking powder, vanilla, protein powder, nuts, stevia, chocolate, and 2 T of the coconut oil and mix again.
  4. Coat a large baking pan or sheet with the other 2 T of coconut oil.
  5. Spread the mixture evenly across the pan.
  6. Bake for 12-15 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Here’s what the final product looks like (with my festive Christmas decor in the background):

Healthy High Protein Chocolate Chip Cookie / Brownie Recipe

And the best part … it’s actually healthy!

Nutrition (per cookie … makes 12 total cookies):

Calories: 188

Fat: 12.5g

Carbs: 12.5g (3g fiber, 3g sugar)

Protein: 9g

 

If you have a good healthy chocolate chip cookie recipe … or another healthy dessert you think might be good with some Pure Food Protein powder, send me your recipe and I’ll do some experimenting!

Scott@purefoodcompany.com

P.S. Fashion Santa loves Pure Food.

healthy cookie recipe for santa